Ovarian cancer survival warning

Misdiagnosis and delays in treatment for ovarian cancer are cutting survival chances for women. It can take up to six months to receive a positive diagnosis for some women, with more than half of all cases misdiagnosed.

Government: We 'aim to improve cancer survival rates'

Research from a cancer charity has found that over half of ovarian cancer cases are misdiagnosed.

According to Target Ovarian Cancer, up to 500 lives could be saved if the disease was diagnosed much earlier.

Early diagnosis is at the core of our £750 million cancer strategy and plays a vital role in our aim to improve cancer survival rates and save an extra 5,000 lives every year by 2014.

This is why last week we launched the Be Clear on Cancer campaign to raise public awareness of the key symptoms of ovarian cancer and encourage those with the symptoms to visit their GP.

– Department of Health spokesman

UK ovarian cancer survival rate among worst in Europe

The overall five-year survival rate of women in the UK with ovarian cancer, is among the worst in Europe, at just under 40 per cent.

Previous studies show that those diagnosed at the first stage of the disease have a survival rate of Nearly 100 per cent.

The charity Target Ovarian Cancer, is today launching its Pathfinder Study at the House of Commons.

The charity has found:

  • One in four women wait more than three months to make an appointment with a doctor after they start suffering symptoms of ovarian cancer
  • Half of those diagnosed wait more than a month to see their GP
  • One in ten GPs have had diagnostic tests refused in the past year
  • Thirty per cent of women are misdiagnosed as having IBS, 15 per cent with ovarian cysts and 13 per cent with a urinary infection

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Ovarian cancer: 'Early diagnosis is key'

A charity is calling for a better diagnosis of ovarian cancer, saying 500 lives a year could be saved if symptoms were recognised at first diagnosis.

Early diagnosis is key. Thirty two per cent of women are diagnosed in A&E. Seventy five per cent of women are diagnosed once the cancer has spread. This is unacceptable.

We must improve symptom awareness with women, improve GP knowledge and ensure they have prompt access to diagnostic tests.

It is imperative that the Be Clear on Cancer awareness campaign is extended across England and that other home nations take similar action to stop women needlessly dying.

– Annwen Jones, the chief executive of Target Ovarian Cancer

Over half of ovarian cancer cases initially misdiagnosed

Misdiagnosis and delays in treatment for ovarian cancer are cutting survival chances for women, a charity has said.

It can take up to six months to receive a positive diagnosis for a third of women with the disease, with more than half of all cases initially misdiagnosed.

500 lives a year could be saved from early diagnosis for ovarian cancer Credit: Hugh Macknight/PA Wire

Target Ovarian Cancer is calling today for better early diagnosis of the cancer, which is often mistaken for Irritable Bowel Syndrome, ovarian cysts and urinary infections.

The charity argues that up to 500 lives a year could be saved if the disease was diagnosed earlier.