N Korea issues US talks demands

North Korea has demanded the removal of UN sanctions imposed for its nuclear and missile tests in order to open up any dialogue with the US.

Latest ITV News reports

Advertisement

Kerry pushes China on the North Korean nuclear crisis

US Secretary of State John Kerry meets China's President Xi Jinping. Credit: Reuters

US secretary of State John Kerry met with China's top leaders today in a bid to persuade them to exert pressure on North Korea to scale back its rhetoric and return to nuclear talks.

Mr Kerry told Chinese President Xi Jinping at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing:

"Mr. President, this is obviously a critical time with some very challenging issues - issues on the Korean peninsula, the challenge of Iran and nuclear weapons, Syria and the Middle East, and economies around the world that are in need of a boost".

Kerry: 'Critical and challenging times'

US Secretary of State John Kerry told Chinese President Xi Jinping that tensions on the Korean peninsula were one of the challenging issues he would be discussing with Xi.

Mr. President, this is obviously a critical time with some very challenging issues - issues on the Korean peninsula, the challenge of Iran and nuclear weapons, Syria and the Middle East, and economies around the world that are in need of a boost.

S Korean activists urge US to enter talks with N Korea

Peace activists in the South Korean capital of Seoul have called on their government and the US to enter into talks with North Korea, as tensions continue to escalate in the region.

The North has released a chain of warlike threats since Seoul and Washington began joint military drills last month.

Activists in the South Korean capital of Seoul chant "Make a conversation with North Korea". Credit: APTN
Peace activists urge the US to enter into talks with North Korea. Credit: APTN

China and US to 'partner together' to solve nuclear crisis

Gary Locke (L), US ambassador to China with President Obama. Credit: Joshua Roberts/ABACA USA/Empics Entertainment

US Secretary of State John Kerry's visit to China is expected to deal with international problems like the Korean Peninsula crisis, according to US ambassador to China Gary Locke.

Mr Kerry arrived in Beijing this morning and is scheduled to meet with Chinese leaders and hold talks with Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi before he leaves China on Sunday.

Mr Locke said: "The frequency of top level US officials visiting China demonstrates how important we view the US-China relationship...and how much we want our two countries to partner together to solve some of the tough issues facing not just China, United States, but indeed the world".

Advertisement

US: China can make a difference in North Korea

There is no group of leaders on the face of the planet who have more capacity to make a difference in this than the Chinese, and everybody knows it, including, I believe, them.

They want to see us try to reach an amicable resolution to this.

But you have to begin with a reality, and the reality is that if your policy is denuclearisation - and it is theirs as it is ours as it is everybody's except the North's at this moment - if that's your policy, you've got to put some teeth into it.

– US Secretary of State John Kerry

John Kerry: 'North Korea must denuclearise'

Secretary of State John Kerry shortly before leaving Seoul. Kerry flies to China on Saturday and to Japan on Sunday. Credit: REUTERS/Paul J. Richards/Pool

The United States and South Korea offered keep their end of a defunct 2005 aid agreement with North Korea, provided Pyongyang took take "meaningful steps" to denuclearise.

In a joint statement released as US Secretary of State John Kerry wrapped up his first visit to Seoul, the two sides appeared to put the accent on diplomacy after weeks of threatening rhetoric from Pyongyang.

"We will continue to encourage North Korea to make the right choice. If North Korea does so, we are prepared to implement the commitments under the 2005 Six-Party Joint Statement," it added, referring to the aid-for-denuclearisation agreement.

At a news conference with South Korean Foreign Minister Yun Byung-se, Kerry said the United States wanted to resume talks about North Korea's earlier pledges to halt its nuclear program.

Kerry calls North Korea missile test 'a huge mistake'

US Secretary of State John Kerry has delivered a stark warning to North Korea not to test-fire a mid-range missile, saying it would be "a huge mistake".

During a press conference in Seoul, Kerry said North Korea and its enigmatic young leader would only increase their isolation if they launched the missile that American officials believe has a range of some 2,500 miles - or enough to reach the US territory of Guam.

"If Kim Jong-un decides to launch a missile, whether it's across the Sea of Japan or some other direction, he will be choosing willfully to ignore the entire international community", Kerry told reporters.

ITV News China Correspondent Angus Walker reports:

Load more updates