Nurses 'drowning in admin'

Nurses are "drowning in a sea of paperwork", the Royal College of Nursing (RCN) said after figures suggested they spend 2.5 million hours a week on admin.

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NHS chief: Nurses 'doing far too much' paperwork

I think it is critical that our staff have the maximum amount of time to be with their patients.

We understand that information collection is important...but we are still doing far too much on paper, far too much duplication and it really is taking away the time the nurses could have with patients.

At the moment they are all collecting it separately.

They are all putting (in) separate demands and it means nurses are having to fill in lots of things many, many times.

– Mike Farrar, chief executive of the NHS Confederation of health service providers

Nurses are 'drowning in a sea of paperwork'

Nurses are "drowning in a sea of paperwork", the Royal College of Nursing said after figures suggested they spend 2.5 million hours a week on admin.

A poll on behalf of the union found that nurses across the UK spend an average of 17.3% of their time on non-essential paperwork and clerical tasks.

The RCN, which released the figures ahead of its annual congress, said nurses, who work for a combined 14.3 million hours a week, are being prevented from caring for patients.

Over four in five nurses (81%) said that having to complete non-essential paperwork prevented them from providing care.

These figures prove what a shocking amount of a nurse's time is being wasted on unnecessary paperwork and bureaucracy.

Yes, some paperwork is essential and nurses will continue to do this, but patients want their nurses by their bedside, not ticking boxes.

We are encouraged that the Government has acknowledged this issue, and the ongoing review by the NHS Confederation is a step in the right direction, but urgent action is needed now.

– said Dr Peter Carter, chief executive and general secretary of the RCN.

Almost nine in 10 of the 6,000 nurses surveyed said non-essential paperwork such as filing, photocopying and ordering supplies had increased in the last two years.

In February, Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt announced he commissioned the NHS Confederation to work to see how paperwork could be reduced.

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