Road accidents 'biggest killer'

Extra tests for new drivers will be considered by the Transport Committee today as the latests statistics show the first increase in the number of people killed or seriously injured in road accidents since 1994.

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Young drivers need to 'think about their attitudes'

Road accidents continue to be the biggest killer of young people aged between 15 and 24 in Britain.

TV presenter Sophie Morgan was paralysed in a car accident when she was 18, she told Daybreak that attitudes need to change with young people.

She said the most effective way of reducing the number of deaths is, "tackling this problem at the very beginning, getting to young drivers and making them think about the way that their attitude and their behaviour changes the way that they drive."

Government calls for 'modernisation of driver training'

Government proposals discussed today by the Transport Committee aim to improve young driver safety on the roads, reducing the number of collisions.

  • Education first: The Government will continue to explore further ways to make sure that young people learn the appropriate skills and attitudes towards driving
  • Developing a new post test vocational qualification: To create a new successor to the Pass Plus scheme will be introduced
  • Safety messages: These will be included in the theory test
  • Improving the content and delivery of motorcycle training so that it meets the needs of modern day riding
  • Modernisation of the driver training industry: To offer the range and standards of service that learner drivers need, to help them make an informed choice as to which instructor best meets their needs

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Young male drivers have higher crash rate than females

The Government will today discuss plans to reduce the number of deaths on the roads, road accidents are the main cause of death for young people aged 15 to 24.

  • In 2011 390 people between the ages of 16 and 24 were killed on the roads, 158 of these deaths were young drivers
  • Young male drivers have much higher crash rates than young females, with 27% of 17 to 19 year old males involved in a road collision within the first year of passing their test
  • One in five new drivers will have a crash within six months of passing their tests

Extra tests for new drivers to be considered

Extra tests for new drivers will be considered today, as the latest statistics show the first increase in the number of people killed or seriously injured in road accidents, since 1994.

Picture of a speed limit sign in Morden, South West London Credit: Dominic Lipinski/PA wire

Road accidents continue to be the biggest killer of young people aged between 15 and 24, in 2010 there were more than 280 fatalities on the roads for people aged 16 to 25, including 158 drivers.

The Transport Committee will today discuss plans to make roads safer and reduce the number of deaths on the roads.

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