Obama to visit tornado scene

President Barack Obama will visit Moore, Oklahoma on Sunday. Spokesman Jay Carney said the president will visit "affected families, as well as thank first responders."

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Report: Victims at risk of deadly fungal infections

Doctors treating victims of the Oklahoma tornado should be on alert for a rare deadly fungal infection caused by wind-whipped debris, NBC News has reported.

Five people died from similar infections following the 2011 twister in Joplin, Missouri, it said.

According to the broadcaster, government experts in such infections have warned clinicians to "be aware that these infections can happen".

Six still missing after Oklahoma's tornado

Six adults are still missing following the Oklahoma tornado on Monday, city officials have confirmed.

The state emergency management director said it's not clear whether those people had left their properties, or if they might still be found in the rubble.

A rescue worker searches for survivors in Moore, Oklahoma Credit: Reuters

The 1.3 mile-wide tornado was on the ground for 40 minutes with the US National Weather Service estimating the winds to be between 200 and 210 mph.

Tornado damage bill to top $2 billion

The bill for damage from the Oklahoma tornado could top $2 billion, according to the Oklahoma Insurance Department.

A department spokeswoman said the tally is based on visual assessments of the extensive disaster zone that stretches more than 17 miles, and the fact the tornado lasted 40 minutes.

Two girls survey the wreckage of their home, destroyed by the tornado Credit: Reuters

Between 12,000 and 13,000 homes were destroyed or damaged and 33,000 people were affected in some way by the storm, said Oklahoma City Mayor Mick Cornet.

Two years ago, the 2011 tornado which hit Joplin in Missouri caused around $2.8 billion in damages.

President Obama to visit Oklahoma tornado town

President Barack Obama will visit Moore, Oklahoma - the scene of the devastating tornado - on Sunday.

Spokesman Jay Carney said the president will visit "affected families, as well as thank first responders."Authorities have confirmed two infants are among the 24 people confirmed dead.

President Barack Obama will visit Moore, Oklahoma on Sunday Credit: PA Wire

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Witness describes school as 'like a war zone'

One eyewitness described Briarwood Elementary School after the tornado hit as being "like a war zone".

Mr Routon told ITV News Correspondent Robert Moore: "It was pretty much chaos. The school looked like it had been hit by a bomb, it was like a war zone, and it was just chaos with parents ... trying to race up into the school yard to find their children.

"The teachers did an outstanding job of protecting those kids while they were in the school and getting them out safely".

Rescue turns to recovery as Oklahoma search nears end

Rescue workers believe their search of the debris left by the tornado that tore through Oklahoma is almost over.

Moore's fire chief, Gary Bird, said he was "98% sure" nobody else would be found in the wreckage of Moore, Oklahoma.

Teachers who braved the storm with their young pupils have been speaking of the terrifying experience of being trapped as the tornado struck.

ITV News reporter Lewis Vaughan Jones reports.

Officials increasingly confident no one left in rubble

Rescue workers with sniffer dogs continue to search the wreckage left by a tornado to ensure no survivors remained buried in the rubble of primary schools, houses and buildings in Oklahoma.

Local officials are increasingly confident that everyone caught in the disaster has been accounted for.

Residents walk through debris of homes after the suburb of Moore, Oklahoma.
Residents walk through debris of homes after the suburb of Moore, Oklahoma. Credit: REUTERS/Adrees Latif

Spokesman for Oklahoma Emergency Management, Jerry Lojka, said search-and-rescue dog teams would search for anybody trapped under the rubble, but that attention would also focus on the huge clean-up job.

"They will continue the searches of areas to be sure nothing is overlooked," Mr Lojka said. "There's going to be more of a transition to recovery".

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