New food labelling system

A new front-of-pack food labelling scheme is to be introduced. The voluntary system,, which will cover just over 60% of foods, will involve traffic light colour coding and nutritional information on each product.

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Govt: Compulsory food labelling 'would take far longer'

by - Consumer Editor

The Government has unveiled a new standard food labelling system, but it remains voluntary and firms that do not use it will not be named and shamed.

So why doesn't the Government make it compulsory?

Health minister Anna Soubry told me: "If we were to legislate, it would take far longer and it would get tied up".

Read: 60% of all food sold in UK will carry new labels

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60% of all food sold in UK will carry new labels

All major supermarket chains have signed up to the new labels Credit: Oliver Berg/DPA/Press Association Images

All the major supermarkets - Sainsbury's, Asda, Morrisons, the Co-operative, Waitrose and Tesco - have announced that they will use a new front-of-packet labelling system on their products.

They have been joined by food producers Mars UK, Nestle UK, PepsiCo UK, Premier Foods and McCain Foods.

The Department of Health said the businesses that had signed up to using the new label to date accounted for more than 60% of the food that is sold in the UK.

Coca-Cola and Cadbury 'not using' new food labels

All the major supermarkets - Sainsbury's, Asda, Morrisons, the Co-operative, Waitrose and Tesco - have announced that they will use the label on their products, alongside Mars UK, Nestle UK, PepsiCo UK, Premier Foods and McCain Foods.

However, Coca-Cola and Cadbury have not signed up because they feel the use of guideline daily amounts is a better system, according to the BBC.

Diane Abbott highlights child obesity battle

Shadow public health minister Diane Abbott has given a guarded welcome to announcement on food labelling but insists more must be done to tackle child obesity.

It is welcome news the Government is joining Labour and health groups' campaign for this to happen.

But there is also a danger that this step forward may evaporate once the spotlight has moved on, because the Government is so reliant on these voluntary agreements.

It has got to be part of a wider Government strategy to tackle obesity and diet-related disease.

– Shadow public health minister Diane Abbott

Traffic light food labelling: How it will work

A traffic light food ­labelling system is being brought in by all the major supermarkets from today. The colour will signal products that are high in fat, saturated fat, sugar and salt.

The new labelling system will have a traffic light warning.

Red warning logos will appear on food considered ‘bad’ for health under a new traffic light labelling scheme.

Amber and Green will indicate foods deemed ‘medium’ or ‘good’ in terms of health value.

The amount of fat, saturated fat, salt and sugar will be presented as Reference Intakes - formerly known as Guideline Daily Amounts .

These will show how much of the maximum daily intake a portion accounts for.

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Consistent food label 'will help fight obesity'

We all have a responsibility to tackle the challenge of obesity, including the food industry.

By having all major retailers and manufacturers signed up to the consistent label, we will all be able to see at a glance what is in our food.

This is why I want to see more manufacturers signing up and using the label.

– Public Health Minister Anna Soubry

New food labelling system introduced

A new front-of-pack food label, aimed at tackling obesity, is being launched today - with the backing of health groups and the major supermarkets.

The new labelling system is being introduced to tackle obesity.

The label combines traffic light colour-coding and nutritional information in the new form of "Reference Intakes" in place of GDAs (Guideline Daily Amounts) to show how much of the maximum daily intake of fat, saturated fat, salt, sugar and calories is in a 100g portion.