Ian Brady letter published

A letter in which Moors Murderer Ian Brady claims to have killed four more people has been published for the first time, on the Daily Telegraph website.

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Brady: Ashworth Hospital is like a 'penal warehouse'

Ian Brady has been describing his life in prison and at high-security Ashworth Hospital, where he has been held for 28 years, to a mental health tribunal.

As he spoke publicly for the first time in nearly 50 years, he defended his perceived "paranoid" behaviour insisting he only took "sensible precautions" to protect himself from staff.

A court sketch of Ian Brady as he gave evidence via video link this morning. Credit: ITV News/Priscilla Coleman

Brady also said Ashworth used to be a "decent and progressive" regime but now resembled a "penal warehouse".

He insisted he had "more freedom" in prison - when he spent time in Durham, Parkhurst and Wormwood Scrubs.

The 75-year-old claims he is no longer mentally ill and should be returned to prison to serve the remainder of his whole life sentence.

He will resume giving evidence after a break.

  1. Martin Geissler - ITV News Correspondent

Brady: I mixed with the Krays and Great Train Robbers

Asked why he wants to be sent back to the mainstream prison system, Ian Brady makes no mention of his hunger strike, and says:

"I'll never see the excellent conditions I experienced in Durham again, where I mixed with the Krays and the Great Train Robbers".

Notorious gangsters Ronnie (left) and Reggie Kray Credit: PA/PA Archive/Press Association Images

"Nor will I see the good conditions of Wormwood Scrubs in the 1970's. I was the barber there. I shaved the beards and cut the hair of the staff. Can you imagine that happening now?", he adds.

He says he'd "get on fine" with other prisoners. "I have contact with lots of prisoners in Scottish jails and jails abroad. I know what conditions are like there".

So far he had made absolutely no reference to being given the right to die. Rather, it all seems to be about his right to a comfortable life.

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  1. Martin Geissler - ITV News Correspondent

Brady: Perceived paranoia is 'sensible precautions'

Asked about his "paranoia" in hospital, only coming out at night, protecting himself with a pen, Ian Brady said:

That's not paranoid. That's sensible precautions. I'm not protecting myself against the other inmates, I'm protecting myself against the staff.

In a captive environment, paranoia is unavoidable. Only the prison authorities call it paranoia, prisoners call it sensible precautions.

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  1. Martin Geissler - ITV News Correspondent

Ian Brady says he prefers 'freewheeling conversation'

Ian Brady has told his mental health tribunal he comes out of his room at night in Ashworth Hospital, and he "gets on fine" with nursing staff.

He claims he talks to them about an "eclectic" range of issues.

Brady says he "can't stand robotic people whether they are psychiatrists or just ordinary people. I prefer freewheeling conversation".

  1. Martin Geissler - ITV News Correspondent

Brady memorised Shakespeare and Plato works

Ian Brady is now being asked about his hallucinations.

He says he memorised whole pages of Shakespeare and Plato, and recited them aloud as he walked around.

This is opportunistically seen as psychosis, he says... It's not, he claims, it's normal. "Who doesn't talk to themselves?".

A court sketch of Ian Brady during an previous appearance. Credit: ITV News/Priscilla Coleman
  1. Martin Geissler - ITV News Correspondent

Ian Brady speaks 'clearly' about psychology studies

Ian Brady is addressing his mental health tribunal in Manchester by video link. He is sitting in dark suit and sunglasses with nasal tube inserted.

He's telling the tribunal how he studied psychology in a secure wing of a mainstream prison.

He's speaking clearly and with lucidity in a well-spoken Scottish accent.

His arms are folded. He looks and sounds relaxed.

Brady last spoke at length when giving evidence at trial

  • Ian Brady last spoke at length in public when he gave evidence at his trial at Chester Assizes where he was eventually found guilty of three murders
  • His legal team says he has a severe narcissistic personality disorder but is not mentally ill and could be treated in prison rather than hospital
  • But Ashworth Hospital says Brady is still chronically mentally ill and remains a paranoid schizophrenic who needs around-the-clock care
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