Report: Surge in Islamophobia

A report into anti-Islamic attacks in the UK has revealed a surge in the number of incidents reported since the attack on a soldier in Woolwich. Three-quarters of all recorded incidents took place online.

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How govt is tackling 'scourge' of anti-Muslim attacks

A spokesman for the Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG) gave this response to a report that has found a recent surge in Islamophobic attacks:

This Government is committed to tackling all forms of hate crime and will challenge and marginalise extremists who seek to divide our communities and has set up the first ever cross-Government working group on anti-Muslim hatred to prevent and tackle this problem.

In addition the Department supports a wide range of projects tackling intolerance and building communities resilience to extremists including Tell MAMA which is studying anti-Muslim incidents and offering support to victims.

The message from this Government is unequivocal: there is no place for anti-Muslim hatred or any kind of hatred in Britain, and we are committed to tackling this unacceptable scourge.

– spokesman, dcls

Report: Three quarters of anti-Muslim attacks are online

A report into anti-Islamic attacks in the UK has found that the majority of incidents are taking place online.

Of the 584 incidents recorded between 1 April 2012 and 30 April 2013, three quarters of them occurred online and involved insults, abusive behaviour and threats of offline action.

Researchers also found there was a direct link to far-right groups in almost 70% of reported online incidents, with the English Defence League allegedly being particularly active.

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Report: Surge in Islamophobic attacks since Woolwich

A report into anti-Islamic attacks in the UK has revealed a surge in the number of incidents reported since the attack on a soldier in Woolwich.

Floral tributes left near Woolwich Barracks in south London where Drummer Lee Rigby was murdered Credit: Jeff Moore/Jeff Moore/Empics Entertainment

The report, by Professor Nigel Copsey from Teesside University, found that the average number of incidents reported rose from 1.5 per day to six or seven.

The incidents were being reported to Tell MAMA, a government-funded platform for monitoring attacks of this kind.

But the research shows that under-reporting remains a major problem, which only a third of all incidents recorded between 1 April 2012 and 30 April 2013 being reported to the police.

Read the full report here

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