Snowden Russia asylum bid

Former US spy agency contractor Edward Snowden has applied for temporary asylum in Russia oafter three weeks holed up at a Moscow airport trying to avoid prosecution in the United States on espionage charges.

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Snowden applies for temporary asylum in Russia

Edward Snowden flew into Moscow from Hong Kong on June 23rd. Credit: The Guardian

Former US spy agency contractor Edward Snowden has applied for temporary asylum in Russia after three weeks holed up at a Moscow airport trying to avoid prosecution in the United States.

"He reached the conclusion that he needs to write an application for temporary asylum (in Russia), and this procedure has just been done," Anatoly Kucherena, a lawyer who met Snowden on Friday along with human rights activists, told Reuters.

"For now he is not going to go anywhere. For now he plans to stay in Russia," he said.

Snowden is seeking refuge in Latin America after leaking details of US government surveillance programmes, but has not risked taking any flight that might be intercepted by the United States.

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Russia: No asylum request from Edward Snowden

Russia has not yet received a formal request for political asylum from NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden, the country's foreign minister said.

Edward Snowden pictured on Friday. Credit: Tanya Lokshina/Human Rights Watch

Mr Snowden said on Friday he would apply for asylum in Russia during his first appearance since fleeing to Moscow.

Russia's foreign minister Sergei Lavrov told reporters in Kyrgyzstan: "We are not in contact with Snowden".

US-Russia relations 'would be hit by Snowden asylum'

Edward Snowden held a meeting with representatives from WikiLeaks and Human Rights Watch Credit: Human Rights Watch

The US State Department has warned relations with Russia would be affected if it granted asylum to US intelligence leaker Edward Snowden.

But the spokesman added: "However we are not at that point yet. They still have the opportunity to do the right thing and return Mr Snowden to the United States and that's what our hope is."

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Snowden: 'No regrets' about whistleblowing

Edward Snowden was today seen in public for the first time since making spying claims Credit: Tanya Lokshina/Human Rights Watch

Fugitive Edward Snowden said he does not regret leaking information about US surveillance operations, despite its "costly" impact.

"That moral decision to tell the public about spying that affects all of us has been costly, but it was the right thing to do and I have no regrets," he said.

Snowden confirms Russia asylum bid

Edward Snowden said he has asked Russia to give him asylum until he is able to travel to Latin America:

I ask for your assistance in requesting guarantees of safe passage from the relevant nations in securing my travel to Latin America, as well as requesting asylum in Russia until such time as these states accede to law and my legal travel is permitted.

I will be submitting my request to Russia today, and hope it will be accepted favorably.

– Edward Snowden

Snowden: 'Impossible' to travel to Latin America

Intelligence whistleblower Edward Snowden said he has been offered asylum by Venezuela, Bolivia, Ecuador and Nicaragua, but he added that it is "impossible" for him to travel across the Atlantic:

I announce today my formal acceptance of all offers of support or asylum I have been extended and all others that may be offered in the future. However, some governments in Western European and North American states have demonstrated a willingness to act outside the law .

This unlawful threat makes it impossible for me to travel to Latin America and enjoy the asylum granted there in accordance with our shared rights.

– Edward Snowden
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