Hospitals face 'special measures'

Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt has said 11 of 14 hospitals probed in a report into high death rates will be placed under 'special measures' management.

Latest ITV News reports

Staff told not to resuscitate against patient's wishes

A heart attack victim who woke up to discover a "Do Not Resuscitate" mistakenly attached to his hospital bed has spoken of the "diabolical" care he received. Speaking to ITV News he vowed he would never go back to the Pilgrim Hospital in Lincolnshire again.

The hospital said they would not comment on individual cases, but admitted there were "serious" problems, that they have vowed to tackle. Lewis Vaugh-Jones reports.

Read: Patient charity: Keogh report 'too late'

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Patient's wife criticises Basildon care over 'failings'

Lynn Harvey's husband Phil died in October 2010 following complications from a triple heart bypass operation in September 2009 at Basildon Hospital's cardio unit.

Mrs Harvey claims that her husband caught an infection in his leg following the operation, and has criticised the treatment he received as being blase and hampered by unneccessary delay.

Read: Basildon sorry patient's family 'unhappy with care'

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Basildon hospital takes Keogh feedback 'very seriously'

Basildon and Thurrock University Hospital, one of the trusts heavily criticised in Sir Bruce Keogh's NHS review, said it "welcomes the findings" of the report.

In a statement, trust chief executive Clare Panniker said: "We take very seriously the areas identified as needing urgent and further action and are addressing them as a priority."

A media statement released by the Essex trust Credit: Basildon and Thurrock University Hospital

Trust chairman Ian Luder added: “We are absolutely committed to ensuring that we learn from the Keogh process, and to delivering long term solutions to issues and not short term quick fixes."

More: The 11 hospital trusts placed in 'special measures'

Tameside hospital chief: Lessons will be learned

The acting chief executive of Tameside General Hospital in Manchester, today labelled one of the worst trusts in the country, said her team would "learn lessons" from Sir Bruce Keogh's NHS review.

We've accepted recommendations of the Keogh review in full. There's no ifs and buts. These recommendations will be implemented. Please be assured of that. The new leadership team are committed and will learn lessons from the Keogh report.

We have to accept that there has been a problem. It saddens me as a clinician myself that you do see these reports, but I think we're ready now to move on to the next stage.

– Karen James
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