Health woes for cancer survivors

500,000 cancer survivors are living with debilitating consequences of the disease, Macmillan Cancer Support has warned. They are suffering from pain, chronic fatigue, bowel and urinary problems, mental health issues and sexual difficulties, it says.

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Cancer report shows 'changing nature' of challenges

NHS England said a report that 500,000 cancer survivors are living with debilitating consequences of the disease draws attention to the "changing nature" of the challenges the NHS has to meet.

NHS England said the report by Macmillan Cancer Support shows the 'changing nature' of the challenges. Credit: Dominic Lipinski/PA Wire

A spokesman said, "This is why we have launched a 'call to action' as we need to engage the public and professions in a dialogue about how we create an NHS that meets people's need in a personal way and is fit for the future rather than based on a 20th Century model."

Charity says cancer survival a 'double-edged sword'

Progress in cancer survival is a "double-edged sword", Macmillan Cancer Support has said.

The charity's chief medical officer, Professor Jane Maher, said: "Put simply, the better we get at treating and curing cancer patients, the more people we will have living with the long-term effects of cancer and its treatment.

Macmillian Cancer Support said cancer survival is a 'double-edged sword'. Credit: Macmillan Cancer Support

"Many of these problems can be managed using simple and inexpensive interventions by health professionals, while other more complex issues require specialist services.

"Too many cancer survivors are suffering in silence".

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Cancer 'can increase risk of other serious conditions'

A cancer charity has warned that cancer and its treatment can increase the risk of other serious conditions.

Women living with or after breast cancer are almost twice as likely to suffer from heart failure compared to those who have not had it, according to a report by Macmillan Cancer Support.

Cancer and its treatment can increase the risk of other serious conditions, Macmillian Cancer Support states. Credit: Britta Pedersen/DPA/Press Association Images

Men who are diagnosed with prostate cancer are 2.5 times more likely to get osteoporosis compared to those who have not, the report states.

At least 200,000 cancer survivors are "left with pain" from surgery, radiotherapy or chemotherapy, it said.

The research also showed that one in five people diagnosed with breast, bowel or prostate cancer report "moderate or extreme pain or discomfort" up to five years after diagnosis.

500,000 cancer survivors 'live with poor health'

Half a million cancer survivors are living with debilitating consequences of the disease, a charity has warned.

Macmillan Cancer Support said 500,000 people who have survived cancer went on to face disability and poor health.

Macmillan Cancer Support said 500,000 people who have survived cancer went on to face disability and poor health. Credit: Andrew Parsons/PA Wire

They are suffering from pain, chronic fatigue, bowel and urinary problems including incontinence, mental health issues and sexual difficulties, the charity said.

It also warned that the NHS has been "woefully unprepared" to help cancer survivors.

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