Mums 'feel work discrimination'

At least 25 percent of working mothers feel discriminated against in the work place while pregnant or after returning to their job, research has found.

Women 'legislating themselves out of the workplace'

Business owner Katie Hopkins said it was vital to cut back the "red tape" of maternity legislation for small businesses, and that women are starting to "legislate themselves out of the workplace."

In the studio with Katie O'Donovan from Mumsnet to discuss the discrimination reported by a quarter of working mothers, she said:

"I think what you hear out there on the market from small businesses is that given the choice between a man or a woman, would I take on a women? No I would not. I think women are starting to legislate themselves out of the workplace. "

Read: A quarter of working mums feel discriminated

Your views: Do working mums face discrimination?

We asked subscribers on the ITV News Facebook page their thoughts new research that found at least 25 percent of working mothers feel discriminated against in the work place while pregnant or after returning to their job.

Myrisha Connelly said: "This happened to me when I was expecting my child, and that was over 11 years ago."

Many women are still facing “archaic” attitudes at work after giving birth, a report has found.

Moises Sanchez said: "It's a stupid workaholic culture... leaving family behind... Companies and government need to stop being greedy...."

"My immediate bosses has been so supportive since I returned to work after my first child was born. Now I am pregnant again, they are great", Fiona Emslie said.

Join the debate and let us know what you think at yourstory@itn.co.uk or on Facebook

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'Archaic' attitudes at work for women with children

Many women are still facing “archaic” attitudes at work after giving birth, a report has found.

Two out of five of the women interviewed by law firm Slater & Gordon said they believed younger, childless colleagues were given more support and encouragement.

Jo Swinson
Employment minister Jo Swinson said the Government was committed to helping women make the most of their talents Credit: PA

Employment Minister Jo Swinson did not outright criticise the report findings, but said the Government was committed to “the best use of women’s talents”

"It is illegal to sack a woman because she is pregnant or on maternity leave," she said.

"Such action constitutes pregnancy discrimination and could result in an employer in front of an employment tribunal.

"The Government is committed to making sure that more businesses make the best use of women's talents throughout the organisation, from boardroom to the shop floor."

Working mothers feel they have to 'prove themselves'

One in five mothers returning to work in the UK after maternity leave feel they need to “prove themselves” to their bosses, despite already working for their employers for some time, a new report found.

The data, put together by law firm Slater & Gordon, found more than one in four women felt discriminated against in the work place after having a child.

Despite the equality legislation in place, attitudes and working practices continue to block women in achieving their career aspirations in the UK.

This report shows that there are still negative perceptions of women with children and this kind of attitude is short-sighted and bad for business.

Anecdotally, we hear of mothers complaining about being put on a "mummy track" when back at work, and this research illustrates that this is a real experience for many women.

– Kiran Daurka of Slater & Gordon

A quarter of working mums feel discriminated

At least 25 percent of working mothers feel discriminated against in the work place while pregnant or after returning to their job, research has found.

Working mum
More than one in four mums feel left out at work when returning from maternity leave, says report Credit: PA

Almost 2,000 British working mums said they had not bothered to complain about the unfair treatment and at least 50 percent felt they had not been taken seriously after having a child.

The report, compiled by law firm Slater & Gordon, also revealed a third of women found it “impossible” to climb the career ladder after giving birth.

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