Costa salvage effort complete

The Costa Concordia salvage operation has been completed, the head of Italy's civil protection authority announced. It took engineers 19 hours to raise the ship from its side.

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Pictures show completed Costa Concordia operation

The operation to shift the stricken Costa Concordia ship from the rocks off the Italian island of Giglio has been completed.

The head of Italy's civil protection authority confirmed it took 19 hours to raise the capsized cruise liner onto its side.

Water was pumped into the sponsons (the large metal containers on the side of ship) to help shift the cruise liner back onto its side. Credit: APTN
The Costa Concordia was wrecked in January 2012 after colliding with a rock off the coast of Isola del Giglio. Credit: APTN
Engineering boats surround the cruise liner after the successful operation. Credit: APTN

Costa Concordia salvage operation completed

The previously capsized cruise liner Costa Concordia is seen at the end of the "parbuckling" operation outside Giglio harbour this morning. Credit: Reuters

The Costa Concordia salvage operation has been completed, the head of Italy's civil protection authority announced.

It took engineers 19 hours to raise the ship from its side.

"We are now ready to move to the next steps," engineers announced.

Costa Concordia nearly fully upright

The Costa Concordia appears to be close to fully upright following a 20-hour process to shift the stricken cruise liner.

"Everything is going on according to plan," said the last operational update.

The process could be complete within a few hours. Credit: Reuters
The ship appears to be only a few degrees off horizontal. Credit: Reuters

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How the parbuckling process to right the Costa works

The process to right the Costa Concordia is known as parbuckling, a technical term for rotating a sunken vessel back into an upright position.

The operation involves engineers using jacks and steel pulleys to rotate the ship by 65 degrees.

Engineers use jacks and steels pulleys to rotate the ship by 65 degrees.

Hollow metal boxes, which have been welded to the side of the ship, will be filled with water to help bring the Costa Concordia upright.

Once it is upright, engineers hope to attach an equal number of tanks filled with water on the other side to balance the ship.

Hollow metal boxes, which have been welded to the side of the ship, will be filled with water to help bring the Costa Concordia upright.

The ship will eventually rest on a false seabed around 30 metres underwater, made out of a platform and cement-filled sandbags

The ship will eventually rest on a false seabed around 30 metres underwater.

Raw beef, fish and cheese trapped onboard the Costa

Experts fear the operation to salvage the stricken Costa Concordia could pollute the water as rotting food and chemicals seep out.

According to the Daily Telegraph, onboard the capsized ship there is:

  • More than 24,000lbs of fish
  • Nearly 5,500lbs of cheese
  • 1,500 gallons of ice cream in tubs
  • 24,000lbs of pasta
  • 2,000lbs of onions
  • More than 2,000 pots of jam
  • Nearly 17,000 tea bags
  • 17,000lbs of raw beef
  • Nearly 11,000 eggs
  • 2,346 hot dog buns
  • 815lbs of rabbit meat
  • More than 1,000 gallons of milk
  • 18,000 bottles of wine
  • 22,000 cans of Coca-Cola
  • 1,000 bottles of extra virgin olive oil
  • 46,000 miniature bottles of spirits
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