Syria submits full chemical list

An international watchdog has confirmed Syria has submitted full details of its chemical weapons programme as part of a deal brokered with Russia and the US.

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UK must wait to see details of Syria chemical stockpiles

The UK must wait to receive details of Syria's chemical weapons stockpiles that have been received by an international watchdog.

The Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) confirmed it had received the "expected disclosure" from the Syrians and was "currently reviewing the information".

The Foreign Office, though, said the "unique case" of Syria has forced a delay:

It has made this disclosure as a non-state party. The coming OPCW executive council needs to endorse a new process to handle Syria's chemical weapons.

Once this has been achieved, the OPCW will be in a position to make the Syrian disclosure available to states' parties.

In consultation with partners we will reach a judgment on its credibility. This is only the start of a long and complex process.

– Foreign Office spokesman

Syria makes 'expected disclosure' to weapons watchdog

The Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) says it has received the "expected disclosure" from the Syrian government.

Syria had util the end of today to submit full details of its chemical weapons programme to the international watchdog to comply with an agreement with Russia and the US.

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Syria faces deadline to give chemical weapons details

Syria has until the end of today to submit full details of its chemical weapons programme to an international watchdog as part of a deal brokered with Russia and the US.

The OPCW website confirms it has received some details from the Syrian regime Credit: OPCW

The Organisation for Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) confirmed it has received an "initial disclosure" from Syria

Syria is believed to have around 1,000 metric tonnes of chemical toxins and has agreed to destroy them by the middle of next year under the Russian-US proposal.

Syria chemical weapons 'does not address whole issue'

UN director for Human Rights Watch has said he hoped the debate on Syria that he expects to take place in the General Assembly will serve as a "wake-up call" for the Security Council, which has been deadlocked over a resolution to chemical weapons use.

UN Human Rights Watch director Philippe Bolopion Credit: Reuters

"There's no denying that there is particular urgency this year for the General Assembly", said Philippe Bolopion.

"It will not address the overall situation. Only maybe one or two percent of the 100,000 people who've been killed in Syria over the last two and a half years have been killed with chemical weapons. The rest of the people have died at the hands of conventional weapons", he added.

Syria must hand chemical weapons details by tomorrow

The Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons will only say they have received some documentation and that there is more to come

Under the terms of that plan agreed by the US and Russia, the Assad government must provide a comprehensive list of the nature and location of all of its chemical weapons by the end of tomorrow.

A U.N. chemical weapons expert, wearing a gas mask, inspects one of the sites of an alleged chemical weapons attack. Credit: Reuters/Mohammad Abdullah

Chemical weapons are very much the ugly crown jewels in the Assad defence set-up. His father spent decades building them up in response to the Israeli nuclear threat.

You look at the last ten years of history in the Middle East, what happens to dictators who surrender their weapons of mass destruction or even elect inspectors into having a look at them. If Assad was in a position of strength, he would not be giving up one drop of his nerve agent.

Syria gives chemical weapon details to watchdog

Syria has submitted details of its chemical weapons to The Hague-based chemical weapons regulator, the organisation said.

A diagram released in the UN report into the chemical attack in Syria shows the use of Sarin gas. Credit: United Nations handout

Syria is believed to have around 1,000 metric tonnes of chemical toxins and has agreed to destroy them under a joint Russian-U.S. proposal.

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Kerry's frustration with Syria and Russia clear to see

You can really sense John Kerry's frustration and irritation tonight. It is almost as if Putin and Assad deliberately set out to get under his skin, and I think they probably did.

For the US this issue is very clear, the UN inspectors report proved that the gas attack was the responsibility of the regime and this, in Kerry's words, is categorical and convincing evidence.

Kerry thinks the Russians are playing fast and hard with the facts but in a sense none of this really matters as it was a deal to decommission Assad's weapons. The point is to make the deal agreed in Geneva stick, and that is where it could get really nasty at the UN next week.

The US, the UK, France want the UN resolution underpinned by something that will ultimately threaten force, but the Russians are not going to buy it, and it is difficult to see them shifting their position.

Syria deputy PM: Neither side capable of winning

Syria's deputy prime minister Qadri Jamil has offered the first indication of what the country intends to propose at the delayed conference in Geneva on the state's future.

In an interview with the Guardian, he said:

Neither the armed opposition nor the regime is capable of defeating the other side.

This zero balance of forces will not change for a while.

[The Syrian government will propose] an end to external intervention, a ceasefire and the launching of a peaceful political process in a way that the Syrian people can enjoy self-determination without outside intervention and in a democratic way.

– Syria's deputy prime minister Qadri Jamil

Syria's deputy prime minister says war 'is at stalemate'

The civil war in Syria has reached a stalemate, according to the country's deputy prime minister.

Qadri Jamil told the Guardian that President Assad's government is set to call for a ceasefire at the delayed conference in Geneva on Syria's future.

Qadri Jamil, Syria's deputy prime minister Credit: Reuters//Maxim Shemetov

Mr Jamil said neither side was strong enough to win the two year conflict, which has caused the death of more than 100,000 people.

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