Clinton wants spy leaks debate

Former US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has called for a "sensible adult conversation" about the boundaries of state surveillance following the leaking of secret files by whistleblower Edward Snowden.

Hillary Clinton: 'Wrong to reject debate' on spy leaks

Former US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, who is considering whether to make her second challenge for the Democratic presidential nomination in 2016, said "people need to be better informed".

She made the comments in reference to revelations leaked by former US spy agency contractor Edward Snowden.

We need to have a sensible adult conversation about what is necessary to be done, and how to do it, in a way that is as transparent as it can be, with as much oversight and citizens' understanding as there can be.

It would be going down a wrong path if we were to reject the importance of the debate, and the kinds of intelligence activities that genuinely keep us safe.

This is a problem that is well over a decade old, where these capacities have corresponded with increasing outreach to consumers on the business side and increasing concern about security on the government side.

– Former US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton

Clinton calls for 'adult conversation' over Snowden

Former US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has called for a "sensible adult conversation" about the boundaries of state surveillance following the leaking of secret files by whistleblower Edward Snowden.

Former US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. Credit: Yui Mok/PA Wire/Press Association Images

Mrs Clinton said it would be "going down a wrong path" to reject a debate in the wake of disclosures about the collection of communications data by America's National Security Agency (NSA) and the Government's secret eavesdropping station GCHQ.

Speaking at Chatham House in London, where she collected a prize for her contribution to international diplomacy, Mrs Clinton told the Guardian: "This is a very important question. On the intelligence issue, we are democracies thank goodness, both the US and the UK."

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