'Hidden cameras' in care homes

Adult and elderly people living in care homes could be under constant surveillance if proposals from the Care Quality Commission (CQC) are put into place. The CQC wants to use hidden cameras to help with inspections after a number of scandals.

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Care homes may be monitored with hidden cameras

Standards in care homes could be monitored using hidden cameras, the Care Quality Commission has revealed.

The health and social care watchdog unveiled proposals to use surveillance to help with inspections as part of a wider review into the way it monitors care providers.

"Mystery shoppers" could also be sent in to check on standards.

This report from ITV News' Medical Editor Lawrence McGinty contains images which some may find distressing:

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Care home proposals would 'inspire' workers

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) want to "inspire" workers looking after elderly and adults patients to provide better care, the new head of the CQC told Daybreak.

Andrea Sutcliffe denied a ratings system for care homes would create a divide between outstanding facilities, which would become oversubscribed, and other homes which had not done so well.

She explained: "What we want to do is to encourage people to improve so that we don't get into that situation. We need to make sure that there are good services available."

CQC should ask 'is this good enough for my mum?'

Care homes and adult social care inspectors should ask themselves if they would allow their own mother to stay in the facility they are inspecting, the new Care Quality Commission chief has said.

Andrea Sutcliffe published her priorities in A Fresh Start for the Regulation and Inspection of Adult Social Care.

Ms Sutcliffe also wants to recruit an army of ordinary people with personal experience of the care system to help carry out inspections and introduce a more rigorous ratings system.

We will always be on the side of the people who use care services. For every care service we look at, I want us to ask: 'Is this good enough for my mum?'.

If it is, this should be celebrated. If not, then as the regulator we will do something about it.

Adult social care is the largest and fastest growing sector that CQC regulates and so it is imperative that we get it right.

– Chief Inspector of Adult Social Care Andrea Sutcliffe

CQC will create 'big brother culture'

Proposals to introduce hidden cameras in care homes have been criticised by an industry expert.

Davina Ludlow, the director of care home directory carehome.co.uk, accused the Care Quality Commission (CQC) of creating "a big brother culture" which would "impact on residents' freedom".

Whilst safeguarding is vital, so too is dignity and privacy.

We urge full and meaningful consultation before digital spies infiltrate the care sector.

Not only will covert surveillance impact on residents' freedom, it may also have a knock-on effect on the motivation of staff.

We need to train, support and inspire the next generation of carers, not create a big brother culture where people are afraid to do this vital job.

– director of care home directory carehome.co.uk Davina Ludlow

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Hidden cameras may be used to inspect care homes

People living in adult care homes could be filmed by hidden cameras if proposals from the Care Quality Commission (CQC) are put into place.

Care homes for the elderly could use hidden cameras as part of inspections, the CQC has announced. Credit: PA

The health and social care watchdog unveiled proposals to use surveillance to help with inspections as part of a wider review into the way it monitors care providers.

Andrea Sutcliffe - one of three chief inspectors appointed by the CQC - said the organisation would hold discussions over "the potential use of hidden surveillance".

"We would... like to have an open conversation with people about the use of mystery shoppers and hidden cameras, and whether they would contribute to promoting a culture of safety and quality, while respecting people's rights to privacy and dignity."

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