US seeks extradition of world's most wanted drug lord

The US will seek the extradition of Mexico's drug cartel kingpin Joaquin "Shorty" Guzman, officials said. Guzman was captured in Mexico by US and Mexican law enforcement officials on Saturday.

Mobile phone led to arrest of most wanted drug lord

Guzman was captured on Saturday in Mexico with help from U.S. agencies. Credit: Reuters

Police used a mobile phone to finally track down drug lord Joaquin "Shorty" Guzman, officials have revealed.

The phone, belonging to one of Guzman's aides, provided key information as to the whereabouts of the cartel leader and led police to a beachfront flat where Guzman was hiding.

Officials also revealed that each of Guzman's houses they came across during his decade on the run had steel reinforced doors and an escape hatch below the bathtubs with each latch leading to a series of interconnected tunnels in the city's drainage system.

Read: Guzman's arrest 'major victory in drugs war'

US to seek extradition of Mexican drug cartel kingpin

The United States will seek the extradition of Mexico's drug cartel kingpin Joaquin "Shorty" Guzman, officials said.

Guzman is one of the world's most powerful organized crime bosses Credit: Reuters

Federal prosecutors in New York plan to seek the extradition of Mexico's most wanted man, Guzman, who was captured on Saturday in Mexico with help from U.S. agencies, had long run Mexico's infamous Sinaloa Cartel.

The United States had placed a $5 million bounty on Guzman's head. His cartel has smuggled billions of dollars worth of cocaine, marijuana and methamphetamines into the United States, and fought vicious turf wars with other Mexican gangs

Read: World's most wanted drug lord captured in Mexico

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US 'applaudes' the arrest of Mexico's most wanted man

The US government applauded the arrest of Mexico's most wanted man, drugs kingpin Joaquin "Shorty" Guzman.

US Attorney General Eric Holder described the arrest as "a landmark achievement, and a victory for the citizens of both Mexico and the United States."

Guzman's cartel has smuggled billions of dollars worth of cocaine, marijuana and ethamphetamines into the United States, and fought vicious turf wars with other Mexican gangs.

Read more: World's most wanted drug lord captured in Mexico

"The criminal activity Guzman allegedly directed contributed to the death and destruction of millions of lives across the globe through drug addiction, violence, and corruption," Holder said in a statement.

Mexico's most wanted man paraded in public

Mexican authorities showed the world's most-wanted drug lord, Joaquin "Shorty" Guzman, to the public at Mexico City airport.

Guzman is one of the world's most powerful organized crime bosses Credit: REUTERS

"Shorty" runs Mexico's infamous Sinaloa Cartel and is believed to command groups of hitmen from the US border into Central America.

Read: Mexican drug kingpin Joaquin 'Shorty' Guzman captured

Mexico: Guzman's arrest 'major victory in drugs war'

Mexico's most wanted man, drug kingpin Joaquin "Shorty" Guzman, has been captured, President Enrique Pena Nieto confirmed, announcing a major victory for the government in a long, brutal drugs war.

Military personnel during a raid in Mazatlan Credit: Reuters

Pena Nieto confirmed the arrest via Twitter on Saturday and congratulated his security forces.

The capture is a huge political victory for Pena Nieto, who took office in late 2012. "Guzman is the jewel in the crown, the most wanted drug boss in recent years and in that sense this is a great success," said Jorge Chabat, an expert on drug trafficking at the CIDE research center.

Captured Mexican drug lord 'Chicago's Enemy No. 1'

Mexico's most wanted man, drug kingpin Joaquin "Shorty" Guzman, has been captured in Mexico by US and Mexican law enforcement officials, sources told Reuters, in what would mark a major coup in a grisly fight against drug gangs.

"Shorty" Guzman runs Mexico's infamous Sinaloa Cartel and is believed to command groups of hitmen from the US border into Central America.

A mug shot of Joaquin 'Shorty' Guzman Credit: US State Department

The United States had placed a $5 million bounty on Guzman's head and authorities in Chicago last year dubbed him the city's first Public Enemy No.1 since gangster Al Capone.

"Shorty" Guzman escaped a Mexican prison in a laundry cart in 2001 to become the country's most high-profile trafficker.He was indicted in the United States on dozens of charges of racketeering and conspiracy to import cocaine, heroin, marijuana and crystal meth.

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