Richard III descendents lose High Court battle over remains

The High Court has ruled it is time for the remains of Richard III "to be given a dignified reburial, and finally laid to rest" - in Leicester Cathedral.

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Richard III burial decision 'highly regrettable'

A mock up of Richard III based on research from the Society of Antiquaries. Credit: PA

The lawyer who spearheaded Richard III's descendants' legal challenge has described the High Court decision as "highly regrettable".

Matthew Howarth, partner at Yorkshire law firm Gordons, said his clients were now considering appealing against the ruling.

Mr Howarth said: "We obviously respect and accept today's verdict, and are grateful to have had the opportunity to raise this matter before the courts, but are naturally disappointed at the decision, which we regard as highly regrettable."

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Leicester 'proud' to bury Richard III

Leicester Cathedral where Richard III will now be buried. Credit: PA

Nick Rushton, leader of Leicestershire County Council, said: "I'm glad the waiting is over and the issue is finally settled.

"It has been a very undignified time as you must remember this is the body of a man - and a king of England. He deserves to be buried with dignity and honour in Leicester Cathedral.

"Next year it will be 530 years since Richard III died at Bosworth - the last King to die in battle - and it will be with great pride that the people of Leicestershire will be part of the ceremony."

Richard III court battle was 'waste of time and money'

Justice Secretary Chris Grayling. Credit: Lewis Whyld/PA Wire

Justice Secretary Chris Grayling has blasted Plantagenet Alliance, the group who fought to have Richard III buried in York, for wasting taxpayers money.

He said he was pleased with the High Court's decision to rebury the King's remains in Leicester, where they were found.

He added: "I am frustrated and angry that the Plantagenet Alliance - a group with tenuous claims to being relatives of Richard III - have taken up so much time and public money."

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City Mayor: 'It is now in hands of Cathedral'

The Leicester City Mayor, Sir Peter Soulsby, said:

"After the frustration of recent months it is now in the hands of the Cathedral to make proper provision for the re-interment of Richard III, and that his remains would be laid in a tomb fit for a king."

Speakers at the King Richard III press conference, including the city's mayor (pictured fourth from left) Credit: ITV News Central

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Richard III to get 'dignified' burial in Leicester

Portrait of Richard III. Credit: University of Leicester

The remains of King Richard III will be buried in Leicester, where his remains were found in a car park.

Three High Court judges ruled they should stay there rather than be returned to his descendants.

They said it was "time for King Richard III to be given a dignified reburial, and finally laid to rest".

It is thought the remains will now be buried at Leicester Cathedral.

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King Richard III remains to be buried in Leicester

The High Court has ruled that the University of Leicester has the right to bury King Richard III's remains in the city's cathedral.

Skeletal remains of King Richard III Credit: University of Leicester

The King's remains were discovered buried under a council car park in Leicester in 2012.

Ledger stone for King Richard III in Leicester Cathedral Credit: ITV News Central

Relatives of King Richard III won the right to bring High Court proceedings to challenge where his remains should be buried, but now a judicial review has ruled that the King's remains will be reburied in Leicester.

More reaction to follow.

Leicester's actions over king's remains 'inexplicable'

The Plantagenet Alliance Ltd, formed by the distant relatives of King Richard III, are fighting for the late monarch's remains to be buried at York Minster, claiming it was the king's wish.

Read: High Court battle over King Richard III's final resting place begins today

They are bringing judicial review proceedings against Justice Secretary Chris Grayling, the University of Leicester - which intends to bury the remains at Leicester Cathedral - and Leicester City Council.

Their solicitor, Matthew Howarth, from law firm Gordons, said:

Quite why our opponents have declined the obviously sensible option of independent adjudication, preferring to incur substantial legal costs - including for the taxpayer - and tie up considerable court time, is inexplicable.

Although many people are astonished we've got this far, we'll go to the hearing with every confidence in our position, intending to state our case clearly and believing there's every chance the licence will be quashed.

If that happens, the odds about the king eventually being laid to rest in York will shorten dramatically.

At the heart of the case is a Ministry of Justice decision to grant a "section 25 licence" under the Burial Act giving archaeologists from the university licence to excavate, and the university permission to decide where to re-bury the bones, which were exhumed in the city 19 months ago.

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