Goodman: Coulson asked me to admit I was a lone wolf

Former News of the World royal editor Clive Goodman has told the Old Bailey he was "hung out to dry" after his arrest. In a meeting with Andy Coulson, he said his boss allegedly tried to convince him to admit he was a "lone wolf".

Clive Goodman taken ill as he enters witness box

Former News of the World royal editor Clive Goodman was taken ill today as he was about to enter the witness box for the fifth day at the hacking trial.

Former News of the World royal editor Clive Goodman. Credit: Press Association.

The 56-year-old had attended the Old Bailey to be cross-examined for a second day by former NotW editor Andy Coulson's defence barrister.

But the trial was adjourned because Goodman was feeling unwell, the judge, Mr Justice Saunders, told the jury.

The court has heard that Goodman, of Addlestone, Surrey, pleaded guilty to phone hacking in 2006 with private investigator Glenn Mulcaire.

He now faces charges of conspiring to commit misconduct in a public office, which he denies.

Goodman: I have had to say things which cause me pain

Former News of the World royal editor, Clive Goodman, has told the Old Bailey he was "pretty cross" with Andy Coulson, News International and the News of the World but that faded by the time he got out of prison.

Former News of the World Royal Editor Clive Goodman. Credit: Press Association

Explaining his feelings now, he said: "Purely in the interest of self-defence, I have had to say things which cause me some pain, really, to be honest. There it is, I have no choice.

Goodman, 56, of Addlestone, Surrey, denies conspiracy to commit misconduct in public office.

Coulson, 46, of Charing, Kent, denies conspiring to hack phones and commit misconduct in a public office.

All the other defendants in the case deny the allegations against them.

The trial was adjourned until tomorrow.

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Goodman told he won't return if he implicated others

The phone hacking court has heard that during a meeting on an upcoming case, a company lawyer told him he would not be dismissed as long as he did not implicate anyone else.

If he named others, Goodman said he was told: "You cannot expect Andy to take you back after that."

The company lawyer also allegedly told Goodman that Coulson would deny any responsibility or involvement.

Read more on the phone hacking case at the Old Bailey

Coulson 'set up payments' on phone hacking

Former editor Andy Coulson "set up the payments to facilitate" phone hacking at the News of the World, it was claimed in court today by former royal editor Clive Goodman, who made the accusation against his old boss.

Clive Goodman, former royal editor of the News of the World.
Clive Goodman pictured today outside of court. Credit: REUTERS/Andrew Winning

Goodman later described that he felt he was being "hung out to dry" after his arrest.

In a meeting with Coulson at a cafe in Wimbledon, south west London, he said his boss allegedly tried again to convince him to admit he was a "lone wolf" and had "gone off the reservation".

Former NotW editor Coulson 'saw hacked call transcript'

Former royal editor Clive Goodman told the phone hacking trial that ex-News of the World editor Andy Coulson saw a transcript of a hacked voicemail left by Prince Harry.

Former News of the World editor Andy Coulson arrives at the Old Bailey in London today for the phone hacking trial Credit: PA

Goodman told the Old Bailey that he was first alerted to the prince's message by private detective Glenn Mulcaire in December 2005 and then listened to it himself and made a transcript, which he went on to show Coulson, redacting the names with X and Y.

Read: Prince William's phone message to Kate 'was recorded'

In an email read out in court, he told Coulson: "As you know it's 100% fact."

Asked by his lawyer lawyer, David Spens QC, why he says that, Goodman told the court it was because he had seen the transcript.

Read: Goodman: I told Coulson of plan to monitor phones

Goodman, 56, of Surrey, admitted phone hacking and was sentenced with Mulcaire in 2007.

He denies conspiring to commit misconduct in a public office. All the defendants in the case deny the charges against them.

Goodman: I told Coulson of plan to monitor phones

Former News of the World royal editor Clive Goodman has told the hacking trial that he told former editor Andy Coulson in 2005 of a plan with private investigator Glenn Mulcaire to monitor the phones of three royal contacts.

Goodman said Mulcaire was paid through a special managerial budget, separate from the news editors' budget.

"I didn't set up the account," he told the court, "that was done by Andy Coulson."

Gooman said he understood "monitoring" to mean be contacting security.

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Prince William's phone message to Kate 'was recorded'

A phone message from Prince William to Kate Middleton arranging for them to meet was intercepted by a private investigator working for the News of the World, the hacking trial was told today.

A phone message from Prince William to Kate Middleton was intercepted, the hacking trial was told today. Credit: PA

The message recorded by Glenn Mulcaire was of William arranging to leave Sandhurst to meet his then-girlfriend, the Old Bailey heard. It was found on a micro-cassette in former royal editor Clive Goodman's flat.

Goodman, 56, was asked about the recording during his third day in the witness box. His lawyer, David Spens QC, read out relevant parts of a police transcript on the tape dated February 23 2006.

In it, William says: "Hopefully I should be able to leave by seven at the latest."

Later in the message he repeats: "Planning on definitely coming out by sevenish so I will be with you by eight at the latest."

Read: Goodman: Royals 'gave me information'

Mr Spens asked Goodman: "How did this voice message from Prince William to Kate Middleton come to be on a micro-cassette?" Goodman replied: "This was originally recorded by Glenn Mulcaire."

Goodman admitted phone hacking and was sentenced in 2007. He denies conspiring to commit misconduct in a public

Morgan 'shameful' for exposing royal source

Piers Morgan, pictured in 2004. Credit: PA Images

Former News of the World reporter Clive Goodman told the court he learned to protect his contacts after former editor Piers Morgan made a "shameful" decision to expose a former royal source in the 1990s.

Royal aide Ken Stronach had wanted the NotW to help him get a book deal for his life story. Instead, it was decided to do a story exposing him.

Mr Stronach was arrested, threatened with charges of theft of royal property and eventually released without charge and dismissed, he said.

Goodman said he was also "pulled up by the royal protection squad and threatened" with aiding and abetting. He said: "It was very, very nasty.

"What we did then was pretty discreditable. It was a pretty shameful thing to do."

Goodman said the incident taught him to protect his sources, even from colleagues, and secondly that it is "a dangerous world out there".

More: Goodman: Royals 'gave me information'

Goodman: Royals 'gave me information'

Former News of the World reporter Clive Goodman told the hacking trial today that some of his sources were members of the Royal Family.

Clive Goodman
Clive Goodman says members of the Royal Family gave him information for stories. Credit: PA

Mr Goodman told the Old Bailey he had dozens of sources during his time as royal editor, only some of whom he paid.

Asked by his lawyer David Spens QC about the nature of his contacts, Goodman said: "Some worked for the Royal Family, some were friends of the Royal Family, indeed some were members of the Royal Family themselves."

The 56-year-old, of Addlestone, Surrey, who denies conspiring to commit misconduct in public office, was questioned in the witness box for a second day.

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