Few fathers take paternity new report reveals

A new study has revealed that one in four new fathers do not take paternity leave and few go beyond the statutory two week break.

Gove 'hung around eating biscuits' on paternity leave

Education Secretary Michael Gove "hung around the house, eating biscuits and getting cups of tea made for him" when he was on paternity leave, his wife Sarah Vine told ITV's The Agenda.

"I think it's too much," the columnist said of the two-week paternity leave entitlement. "Having fathers around sort of hovering in the first two weeks, well it was just a bit annoying."

Read: Few fathers take paternity new report reveals

ILM: Shared parental leave crucial for women

The Institute of Leadership & Management said plans for shared parental leave from April 2015 will have little impact if "ingrained" attitudes were not tackled. The report warned that low levels of paternity pay affected take up of leave.

The ILM say that shared parenting is crucial in enabling women to progress, Credit: Edmond Terakopian/PA Wire

ILM boss Charles Elvin said: "The introduction of shared parental leave is a crucial step towards enabling more women to progress into senior roles, yet our research revealed cultural barriers are impeding the uptake of both two weeks statutory paternity leave and additional paternity leave.

"The paternity pay gap not only creates practical financial barriers to shared parental leave, it also reinforces a cultural expectation within organisations that women will be the ones taking extended periods away from the workplace, which may halt their career progression."

Just 9% of fathers receiving anything longer than two weeks at full pay.

Read: Few fathers take paternity new report reveals

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Few fathers take paternity new report reveals

A new study has revealed that one in four new fathers do not take paternity leave and few go beyond the statutory two week break.

Few fathers take paternity. Credit: Edmond Terakopian/PA Wire

Research among almost 1,000 employees and 800 managers found that a lack of support from employers was to blame for limiting time off among men after the birth of their child.

The Institute of Leadership & Management (ILM) said its survey also found that fewer than one in 10 new fathers take more than two weeks of paternity leave, falling to just 2% among managers.