Tests claim chemical weapons used in new Syria attacks

Syria is still using chemical weapons against its own people, scientific analysis carried out for the Telegraph has claimed.

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Chlorine attacks 'could be seen elsewhere'

The use of chlorine against Syrian civilians could lead to similar attacks elsewhere in the world, a scientist at the heart of new revelations into chemical weapons use has found.

Hamish De Bretton-Gordon - a British chemical scientist involved in testing samples from recent attacks for the Telegraph - said that such incidents could have a major "psychological impact".

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'Chemical attacks' took place in western Syria

Samples were taken from suspected attacks in Talmenes and Kafr Zita earlier this month. Credit: Google Maps

Chlorine and ammonia is suspected to have been used during helicopter attacks in two urban areas in the west of Syria.

An investigation by the Telegraph tested samples from two separate gas attacks in the city of Kafr Zita, and one other in the village of Talmenes.

Scientific analysis of samples from the attacks - which all took place this month and injured several women and children - showed evidence of chlorine and ammonia use, the newspaper says.

Chemicals expert: Chlorine attacks 'easy to identify'

A chemical weapons expert involved in the apparent discovery of continued chemical weapons attacks in Syria told ITV News earlier this week that chlorine use is "simple to identify".

Hamish De Bretton-Gordon told Diplomatic Correspondent John Ray that Syrians should be armed with information on how to identify such attacks.

He added, however: "It's very, very non-persistent - once it's released it will remain active for, at the most, minutes.

"If there is a strong wind and if it is hot as it is in Syria it will disappear very quickly."

Syria 'still using chemical weapons on civilians'

Syrian president Bashar al-Assad. Credit: Instagram/syrianpresidency

Syria is still using chemical weapons against its own people, scientific analysis carried out for the Telegraph has claimed.

The newspaper says soil samples taken from the scene of three recent gas attacks "show sizeable and unambiguous traces of chlorine and ammonia present at the site of all three".

International protocol bars nations from using "asphyxiating, poisonous or other gases" during war.

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