Apple 'formally investigated' over tax in Ireland

The Irish Government has said it will pass any test on tax laws after European chiefs launched investigations into tax breaks allowing Apple to save hundreds of millions.

Apple: We pay all the tax we owe

Apple has said it pays all the tax it owes amid an investigation into its operations in Ireland.

Success and growth come from the hard work of our Irish employees, not from any special tax deal with the Irish Government.

We have received no selective treatment from Irish officials. Apple is subject to the same tax laws as scores of other international companies doing business in Ireland.

Apple pays every euro of every tax that we owe. Since the iPhone launched in 2007, our taxes in Ireland have increased tenfold.

– Apple spokesperson

Ireland confident of passing tax tests amid Apple probe

The Irish government has brushed off questions about its tax laws.
The Irish government has brushed off questions about its tax laws. Credit: Niall Carson/PA Wire

The Irish Government has said it will pass any test on tax laws after European chiefs launched investigations into tax breaks allowing Apple to save hundreds of millions.

In response to the state aid inquiry by Brussels, finance chiefs in Dublin have stressed that the global brand did not get a special deal or selective treatment before setting up in Ireland.

The Apple case is one of three being examined by the European Commission - the others are the tax arrangements of coffee giant Starbucks in the Netherlands and Fiat Finance and Trade in Luxembourg.

The Commission said it has concerns that tax calculations by finance chiefs amounted to a sweetheart deal by underestimating taxable profit on its products like iPhones and iPads, creating an unfair advantage and lower tax bills.

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Apple 'formally investigated' over tax in Ireland

Technology giants Apple Inc are to be formally investigated over its tax arrangements in Ireland, the European Commission has said.

Last year it was revealed the company had cut billions from its tax by declaring companies in Cork and not tax resident in any other country.

The EU's competition authority has been looking into corporate tax arrangements in several member states.