Whiplash assessment charges cut in bid to tackle fake claims

Fees charged for medical reports of people who say they have suffered whiplash injuries are to be heavily cut in a bid to reduce fraudulent claims.

The government said the move was aimed at tackling Britain's "compensation culture".

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Grayling: Honest drivers bearing cost of abused system

Justice Secretary Chris Grayling has vowed to improve the process for whiplash claims so "honest drivers" no longer bear the cost of a system that has been abused.

Chris Grayling said he wanted to introduce a 'robust' system for whiplash claims. Credit: PA Wire

Grayling announced that the amount medical professionals can charge for reports on people who claim to have suffered whiplash has been drastically reduced from up to £700 to £180.

It is the latest measure announced by the government as they bid to end Britain's "compensation culture".

"Honest drivers have been bearing the cost of a system that has been open to abuse and it is time for a change," the Justice Secretary said.

"We are determined to have an improved, robust system for medical evidence - so genuine claims can still be settled but fraud is driven out of the market."

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New measures aimed at tackling 'compensation culture'

Plans to cut medical assessment fees of people who claim to have suffered whiplash are part of a wave of measures to tackle Britain's "compensation culture".

Plans include:

  • Lawyers can no longer double their fees if they win a case
  • "Referral fees" paid between lawyers, insurers and claims firms have been banned
  • Allowing courts to throw out compensation cases which part of the claim has proved to be fundamentally dishonest
  • To ban law firms from offering incentives to clients

Whiplash assessment charges to be heavily reduced

Fees charged for medical reports of people who say they have suffered whiplash injuries are to be heavily reduced in a bid to tackle fraudulent claims.

Insurers believe whiplash claims add £90 a year to the average motor insurance policy. Credit: PA Wire

Charges of up to £700 will be drastically cut to £180 for an initial whiplash report, under plans announced by Justice Secretary Chris Grayling.

The government said the measures were aimed at combating Britain's "compensation culture", which sees 500,000 whiplash claims take place each year.

Insurers estimate the claims add £90 a year to the average motor insurance policy.

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