British Ebola nurse may return to Africa 'within weeks'

The British nurse who survived Ebola has hinted he could return to the country where he contracted the deadly virus within "a few weeks".

In an interview with the Guardian, the 29-year-old volunteer nurse from Suffolk said, "It's the least I could do to go back and return the favour to some other people, even just for a little while."

A football stadium in the Liberian capital Monrovia will be converted to house two large Ebola treatment units, Fifa has announced.

The football federation said it had teamed up with the World Health Organisation and the United Nations to transform the Antoinette Tubman Stadium for use in the fight against the epidemic.

The World Health Organisation announced that the death toll from the Ebola outbreak has now risen to at least 2,296 out of 4,293 cases.

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Julia Gillard warns Ebola 'robs children of education'

Former Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard Credit: ALAN PORRITT/AAP/Press Association Images

Fear and misunderstanding about the Ebola virus is intense and widespread, complicating the efforts of health workers to contain the disease, former Australian prime minister Julia Gillard has said.

Writing in the Guardian, Ms Gillard said that vigilance and flexibility may be "our best response to the virus", but warned that children were being kept away from education and thus the "seeds are also being sown for ongoing problems in public heath".

British Ebola nurse may return to Africa 'within weeks'

The British nurse who survived Ebola has hinted he could return to the country where he contracted the deadly virus within "a few weeks".

William Pooley pictured in London before he was discharged from the Royal Free Hospital. Credit: PA

William Pooley was flown from Sierra Leone to the UK for treatment and was given the experimental drug ZMapp, before being given the all-clear and discharged.

Speaking to the BBC, Mr Pooley said:

I'm quite impatient to get back doing what I know needs to done.

And I feel like I've left things undone, having left prematurely. And I know there's a lot of work to do out there, and we need to get out there and do it.

– William Pooley

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US aid worker infected with Ebola 'steadily improving'

An American aid worker infected with the Ebola virus has responded well to aggressive treatment in the past week, his doctors said on Thursday.

Dr Rick Sacra, who was infected with the virus while working at a hospital in Liberia, received blood transfusions from Dr Kent Brantly, a close friend, shortly after arriving at the Nebraska Medical Center in the United States last Friday.

Brantly, 33, is one of the first two Americans who survived Ebola after receiving treatment in Atlanta last month.

"It really meant a lot to us that he was willing to give that donation so quickly after his own recovery", Sacra's wife, Debbie, said.

Liberia football stadium converted into Ebola centre

A football stadium in the Liberian capital Monrovia will be converted to house two large Ebola treatment units, Fifa has announced.

The football federation said it had teamed up with the World Health Organisation and the United Nations to transform the Antoinette Tubman Stadium for use in the fight against the epidemic.

Sepp Blatter said Fifa was using the Credit: PA

The stadium, which FIFA donated to Liberia's Football Association, would "serve as the site for two urgently needed large-scale Ebola treatment units," it said.

"Today we can use the power of football to combat the Ebola epidemic," Fifa president Sepp Blatter said.

British Ebola nurse 'may return to help in Sierra Leone'

The British nurse who survived Ebola has hinted he could return to the country where he contracted the deadly virus to help fight the outbreak.

William Pooley was flown from Sierra Leone to the UK for treatment and was given the experimental drug ZMapp, before being given the all-clear and discharged.

William Pooley pictured in London before he was discharged from the Royal Free Hospital. Credit: Andrew Matthews/PA Wire

But in an interview with the Guardian, the 29-year-old volunteer nurse from Suffolk said, "It's the least I could do to go back and return the favour to some other people, even just for a little while."

"While I'm happy to be recovered and alive, there's a lot of stuff on my mind with what's going on back there. It would be relatively safe for me to go back and work there," Mr Pooley added.

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Third US Ebola victim 'improving but still very sick'

The third US citizen to be diagnosed with the deadly virus Ebola is showing signs of improvement after being treated at a Nebraska hospital but is "still very ill", according to his wife.

The spread of Ebola shows no signs of slowing down. Credit: Reuters

American doctor Rick Sacra arrived back in America on Friday after contracting the disease in Liberia.

His wife Debbie told Reuters: "Rick is very sick and weak, but slightly improved from when he arrived.

"But we don't want this story to be about Rick. The story is the crisis in West Africa. That is what is most important. The world is coming to this fight late."

Dr Mark Rupp, who is treating Dr Sacra, told a news conference: "Our patient is sick but stable."

Ebola has now killed more than 2,000 people and infected more than 4,000 since the outbreak began in Guinea in March.

Sierra Leone lockdown to 'identify Ebola patients'

Sierra Leone's "lockdown" in response to the Ebola crisis will take place over three days, from 19 September, the country's information minister has told ITV News.

Alpha Kanu speaking to ITV News today.

Alpha Kanu said the move was on the advice of the international community and a number of health and humanitarian organisations including the Red Cross and Médecins Sans Frontières.

They believe a three-day lockdown will help us identify those people who are sick but who at the moment are afraid or not confident enough to come out ... so they can come out and be treated.

– Alpha Kanu

Sierra Leone lockdown 'not the answer' to outbreak

The four-day "lockdown" set to be imposed in Sierra Leone in a bid to tackle the Ebola outbreak "is not the appropriate answer" and could "jeopardise trust between the people and health providers", a Doctors Without Borders statement said.

In Sierra Leone there is an urgent need to improve the identification of Ebola cases and extraordinary measures are needed to contain this unprecedented epidemic.

Nevertheless, large scale coercive measures like forced quarantines and lockdowns are driving people underground and jeopardising the trust between people and health providers. This is leading to the concealment of cases and is pushing the sick away from health systems.

MSF fears the proposed lockdown is not the appropriate answer to the current outbreak in Sierra Leone.

It will be extremely difficult for health workers to accurately identify cases through door-to-door screening as this requires a certain level of expertise. And when cases are identified, there will not be enough Ebola management centres to care for them.

– Medecins Sans Frontieres / Doctors Without Borders statement
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