Boris Johnson meets MPs amid Tory leadership speculation

Conservative MPs Ben Wallace and Jake Berry have been spotted at Boris Johnson's home amid speculation he could become the next party leader.

Earlier, pro-Brexit former defence secretary Liam Fox became the first Conservative to announce he may put himself forward to replace David Cameron when he stands down shortly.

Mr Johnson is widely expected to stand, while Theresa May, George Osborne, and Michael Gove are also likely to contend the top job.

Mr Cameron announced his intention to resign as prime minister after the country voted to leave the EU, saying his successor should be in place by October.

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Conservative leadership contest gathers momentum

The Conservative leadership contest gathered momentum today as the search for David Cameron's replacement begun.

Conservative MPs Ben Wallace and Jake Berry were spotted at Boris Johnson's Oxfordshire home amid speculation he could become the next party leader.

Elsewhere, former defence secretary Liam Fox admitted he is "thinking about" standing for the Tory leadership.

ITV News political correspondent Carl Dinnen reports:

Conservative MPs arrive at Boris Johnson's home

Ben Wallace MP (right) is greeted by Jake Berry MP. Credit: ITV News

Conservative MPs Ben Wallace and Jake Berry have been spotted at Boris Johnson's home amid speculation he could become the next party leader.

The former mayor of London has been installed as the favourite to replace David Cameron following his resignation in the wake of the leave result of the EU referendum.

Mr Wallace was seen being greeted by Mr Berry and Mr Johnson's home in Oxfordshire as he considers a bid for the party leadership.

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IDS: Leave campaign did not 'promise' £350m for NHS

Iain Duncan Smith said the Leave campaign's NHS promise is not 'broken'. Credit: BBC/ Andrew Marr Show

Former Tory party leader Iain Duncan Smith has denied the Vote Leave referendum campaign has broken its promises to switch £350 million a week from Brussels to the NHS when the UK withdraws from the EU.

Speaking to BBC1's Andrew Marr Show, he said: "It is not a promise broken, I never said that through the course of the election, what I said was we will be able to spend the lion's share of that money."

He also said David Cameron's replacement must come from the Brexit camp.

"Whoever takes up that job... it would be very, very difficult for the public who have voted for leaving the European Union to find that they then had a prime minister who actually was opposed to leaving the European Union."

There was a clear decision, and what has to happen is delivery on that, and somebody who has been involved in that clearly has to be the case, because the Government itself had a view... which was to Remain, so now we need to change that position and actually deliver on this very clear mandate form the British people.

– Iain Duncan Smith

Liam Fox 'thinking about' running for new Prime Minister

Former defence secretary Liam Fox has admitted he is "thinking about" standing for the Tory leadership - making him the first potential contender to reveal his ambitions.

Liam Fox is "thinking about" running to replace David Cameron Credit: PA

Current Prime Minister David Cameron announced his resignation on Friday after losing the referendum campaign to remain in the EU.

Speaking on BBC1's Sunday Politics, Brexit-backing Dr Fox said he believed the October deadline set by Mr Cameron for a new leader should be extended until January next year.

It comes after Iain Duncan Smith said he believed the new Tory PM should come from the 'leave' camp.

Asked if he was running, Dr Fox said: "I have not decided yet. I am thinking about it, it would be dishonest to say otherwise. But I will make a decision once I have spoken to my colleagues in Parliament."

Cameron avoids the limelight at armed forces parade

Mr Cameron watched the parade but made no public speech

David Cameron was in no mood for talking as made one of his first public appearances since announcing that he would step down as prime minister following the UK vote to leave the EU.

The PM honoured a commitment to attend the Armed Forces Day event in Cleethorpes, North East Lincolnshire, but gave no public speech.

Mr Cameron chatted to dignitaries on the platform and applauded at the section of the parade devoted to veterans in wheelchairs.

As he got into his car to leave the town, he managed a brief wave to the crowds.

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Lord Hill to stand down as UK's European Commissioner

Lord Hill is to stand down from his post in the wake of the vote to leave the European Union. Credit: PA

The UK's European Commissioner has announced he is standing down from his post after the referendum vote for Britain to leave the European Union.

In a statement, Lord Jonathan Hill of Oareford said he did not think it would be right for him to carry on in his role "as though nothing had happened".

I wanted it to end differently and had hoped that Britain would want to play a role in arguing for an outward-looking, flexible, competitive, free-trade Europe.

But the British people took a different decision and that is the way that democracy works.

– Lord Jonathan Hill of Oareford

"What is done cannot be undone and now we have to get on with making our new relationship with Europe work as well as possible, " he added.

Lord Hill said he had told Commission president Jean-Claude Juncker he will continue his work as commissioner for financial stability over the coming weeks to allow for an "orderly handover" of his responsibilities.

MP: Do not assume Johnson is 'darling' of Tory activists

Sir Alan Duncan warned against narrowing 'the way in which we look at ourselves'. Credit: PA

The Tory party should not be pressured into picking a Brexit campaigner to replace David Cameron, Conservative MP Sir Alan Duncan has said.

Former mayor of London and key player during the Vote Leave campaign, Boris Johnson, is seen as a clear favourite but Sir Alan cast doubt on his credentials to become prime minister.

The pro-EU MP said he would "probably not" back Mr Johnson and suggested his popularity was shallow.

"Do not necessarily assume that he is the darling of the Conservative Party activists.

"A lot of them have loved the notoriety and the excitement. But actually, once you scratch the surface a little bit and ask the second question, a lot of them don't want a permanent ride on the big dipper."

Sir Alan also dismissed the prospects of George Osborne succeeding Mr Cameron, saying the Chancellor was "much weakened" by his part in the referendum campaign.

"I feel very sorry for him personally. If I were to stick my neck out I think it's going to be very difficult for him to stand on the back of this."

"I would have supported him in different circumstances had he done so," he added.

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