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Liam Neeson quits drinking to focus more on his acting

Liam Neeson has decided to stop drinking to take on more action roles in Hollywood. Neeson turned to alcohol for comfort after losing his wife, who died from a brain injury incurred after a skiing accident in 2009.

Liam Neeson attends the LA Premiere premiere of 'Non-Stop'. Credit: Dave Bedrosian/Geisler-Fotopress

Telling America's GQ magazine, The Taken star said:

"I gave up drinking about a year ago... I was drinking too much. It started since my wife died. Pinot Noir. That's all I drink. I was never into spirits or liquor, hard liquor. And I gave up the Guinness years ago, because it just - past an age, it sticks to you."

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Safest approach in pregnancy is 'not to drink at all'

Women have been told the safest approach in pregnancy is to not drink at all after a recent study found that more than half of women exceed the recommended drinking limits during the first three months of pregnancy.

The Royal College of Obstetricians issued the following advice:

  • The safest approach in pregnancy is to choose not to drink at all
  • No more than one to two units have been shown to be harmful
  • Drinking one to two units no more than once or twice a week has been shown to be harmful
  • One unit of alcohol is equivalent of a half a pint of lager or beer, a glass of wine or a single shot of a spirit
  • Drinking five or more units of alcohol on one occasion is known as binge drinking
  • Regular binge drinking particularly in the early stages, is harmful to a woman and her baby

Read: Middle class women drink 'the most during pregnancy'

Pregnant women should 'avoid all alcohol'

Dr Hilary Jones
Dr Hilary warned women who drank during pregnancy risked causing behavioural, memory and developmental problems in their children. Credit: Daybreak/ITV

Women should avoid all alcohol during pregnancy, according to Daybreak's medical editor Dr Hilary Jones.

He said women drinking during pregnancy, particularly in the early stages, would hurt their unborn child and should follow the advice from the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists and have "none at all".

There is no safe limit but even small amounts of alcohol can affect the baby," Dr Hilary said.

"The baby after all, starts off as a few grams in weight, a woman might weigh six, seven, eight stone - that is a lot of weight to what she is drinking,

"But the baby is getting all the alcohol that a woman is consuming, through a placenta and a baby's developing liver has not got the ability to detoxify the alcohol."

Read: Middle class women 'drink the most during pregnancy'

Middle class women drink 'the most during pregnancy'

Middle class women are more likely than women from other classes to drink more than the recommended limits during pregnancy, researchers said.

They called for health officials to revise their guidance on drinking in pregnancy after their study showed that even those adhering to the suggested limits are more likely to have problems with their babies than those who do not drink at all.

More: Pregnant women 'drink too much'

Pregnant women 'drink too much'

File photo of a woman drinking a glass of wine Credit: PA Wire

More than half of women drink more than the recommended limits during the first three months of pregnancy, a study has suggested.

Some 53% of women drank more than the upper limit of two units a week during the first trimester, with middle class women are more likely than women from other classes to drink more than the recommended limits during pregnancy, figures show.

The study, published in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, examined 1,200 women in Leeds who filled out food frequency questionnaires, including information on alcohol consumption during the month before conception and the three trimesters of pregnancy.

If a woman drank more than two units a week during the first three months of pregnancy they are twice as likely to have a baby who was born "small for gestational age" when compared to non-drinkers, the researchers found.

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Iron Maiden beer has sold 3.5 million pints

Iron Maiden have launched their own beer and named it after one of their most popular songs.
Iron Maiden have launched their own beer and named it after one of their most popular songs. Credit: APEGA/ABACA USA/Empics Entertainment

The Iron Maiden craft ale Trooper has sold 3.5 million pints - and its brewers claim its the most exported British ale - without a penny being spent on marketing.

In 2012, brewers Robinson’s teamed up with the heavy metal group to brew a beer named after one of the band’s best known songs.

Freezing alcohol tax would 'unfairly' burden public purse

In a letter to Mr Osborne, a group of leading medics said that freezing duty rises on drink would "unfairly" increase the burden on the public purse.

It would be madness if the alcohol industry lobby managed to convince the Chancellor to make cheap drink even cheaper at a time when strong white cider can be sold for 6p per unit.

Scrapping the duty escalator would be going against yet another Government commitment to tackle the cheap alcohol that is causing mayhem on our streets and bringing our health service to its knees.

Furthermore, making alcohol more affordable poses a real risk to vulnerable groups such as young women.

– Katherine Brown, director of the Institute of Alcohol Studies

Experts warn against abandoning alcohol tax increases

Abandoning annual tax increases on alcohol would be "madness", experts have warned.Leading medics said that cheap alcohol is "bringing the NHS to its knees" and causing "mayhem" on the streets of Britain.

Experts warn against abandoning alcohol tax increases. Credit: Rui Vieira/PA Archive/Press Association Images

If ministers scrapped the duty rise in the 2014 Budget it would put "even more pressure on public services and frontline workers", the Alcohol Health Alliance said.

The alliance - which is made up of leading health bodies including the Royal College of Physicians (RCP), the British Medical Association, and charity Alcohol Concern - called on George Osborne to maintain the alcohol duty escalator.

SA man harnesses Neknominate craze to do good

A South African man has attempted to harness the popularity of the latest social media craze to do some good.

Neknominate - the online drinking game which is said to have contributed to the deaths of two young men in Ireland - involves participants filming themselves drinking a pint of alcohol and then nominating two friends to do the same.

The process is filmed and then posted online. But Brent Lindeque decided that instead of filming himself drinking, he would film himself giving food to those in need. He then nominates two friends to do the same.

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