Live updates

London airports to learn what charges they may face

Air passengers will today be given the first indication of how fares will change over the next five years at the capital's three main airports.

Passengers queueing at Heathrow's Terminal 5 Credit: Steve Parsons/PA Wire

The Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) will outline its initial proposals for how much airlines will be charged for using London's three main airports between 2014 and 2019.

The plans will have an impact on fares at Heathrow, Gatwick and Stansted airports - the only three airports that are regulated by the CAA.

A final decision is due in January next year.

Passengers advised to check status of US flights

Passengers planning to fly to the east coast of the USA are being advised to check their flight status before leaving for the airport.

Snowstorm Nemo has led to a number of flight cancellations and delays.

Advertisement

Flybe boss: Decision to cut 300 jobs 'not taken lightly'

I am extremely disappointed that many valued and hard-working colleagues may have to leave the organisation.

It's a decision the board and I have not taken lightly; it's one we have tried to avoid and it is the first time in almost 30 years of business that we have had to take such action.

– Jim French, chairman and chief executive of Flybe

UK-based airline Flybe to axe 300 jobs

Around 300 jobs are to be axed at regional airline Flybe as it battles to slash costs by £35 million to stem losses.

The Exeter-based carrier announced plans to cut around 10% of its 3,000-strong UK workforce and is considering outsourcing further support functions, including ground handling and onboard catering.

Flybe plans to cut 10% of its 3,000-strong UK workforce Credit: Andrew Milligan/PA Wire

Support and production roles such as human resources and IT will be affected by the jobs cull, while around a fifth of its management team is being cut.

The group is also putting its network of 13 UK bases under review and will give further details in the summer.

US F-16 fighter crashes off Japanese coast

A US F-16 fighter jet crashed into the Pacific Ocean over 1,000 km (621 miles) off the coast of northern Japan, according to the Kyodo news agency, who cited the Japan Coast Guard as a source.

The jet crashed around 11:00 a.m. Japan time (0200 GMT). It had set off from the Misawa base in Aomori Prefecture. No one at the US armed forces in Japan was available for comment.

Advertisement

Delta investigating needles in sandwiches

The US airline Delta is working with the FBI and officials in the Netherlands to find out how sewing needles entered in-flight meals.

The needles were found in sandwiches on four US-bound flights that left Amsterdam on Sunday.

Delta spokeswoman Chris Kelly said in an email to Reuters that the sandwiches were prepared by the airline's Amsterdam caterer, Gate Gourmet.

Fighter jets called into action after airliner bomb scare

A U.S. F15 takes off from the air base of Cervia in the northern Italy in this April 2, 1999 Credit: Reuters

Two F-15 fighters were scrambled to escort flight 787 with 179 passengers and nine crew on board, after a woman handed a flight attended a note saying that she had a bomb surgically implanted in her.

Passengers were not aware of the two fighter jets because they were advised to keep their shades down during a film, said Stuart Frankel, from Baltimore.

Load more updates