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Children 'among Baghdad bomb casualties'

Children were among the casualties of a suicide bomber who killed 25 people and injured more than 50 in Baghdad, according to police and medical sources.

Wounded people had been taken to four different hospitals, following the attack in al-Qahira, a northern district of the capital.

It was one of the worst attacks in Iraq since suicide bombers hit the same district two months ago, targeting a Shi'ite Muslim mosque and killing 29 worshippers during noon prayers.

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Death toll from Baghdad blasts rises to at least 70

The death toll from a wave of bombings across the Iraqi capital Baghdad has risen to at least 70.

The car bombs exploded in markets in mainly Shi'ite neighbourhoods across the city and are the latest in a surge of sectarian violence.

A car damaged in one of the blasts in Nasr Square, Iraq
A car damaged in one of the blasts in Nasr Square, Iraq Credit: APTN

At least 11 blasts tore into busy markets and shopping areas, including twin bombs just several hundred metres apart that killed at least 13 people in the Sadr City area.

The blast tore the bonnet off the front of this car in Nasr Square, Iraq Credit: APTN

While no group claimed Monday's blasts, Sunni Muslim Islamist insurgents and al-Qaeda's Iraqi wing have increased attacks since the beginning of the year and often target Shi'ite districts to try to trigger wider confrontation.

Baghdad residents inspect a piece of twisted metal close to one of the blasts
Baghdad residents inspect a piece of twisted metal close to one of the blasts Credit: APTN

Baghdad rocked by coordinated suicide attacks

A string of explosions in a space of minutes have torn through central Baghdad, killing at least 22 people and wounding dozens. Credit: APTN
Gunmen raided a government building and battled security forces in the streets in the planned attacks as smoke blackened the city's skies. Credit: APTN
The fighting lasted for about an hour until forces stormed the building and evacuated hundreds of workers who were hiding in their offices. Credit: APTN

Car bombers launch coordinated attacks in Baghdad

At least 21 people, including six policemen and 12 civilians, have been killed in coordinated suicide blasts in the Iraqi capital Baghdad close to the city's Green Zone, police and medics have told Reuters.

Police said two car bombs were detonated, one of them near the justice ministry building, before a suicide car bomber blew himself up near an interior ministry office.

A second suicide car bomber then walked into the justice ministry and militants attacked the building, clashing with Iraqi security forces.

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Gun fights follow deadly blasts in Iraqi capital Baghdad

Gunmen are locked in battle with security forces following a series of deadly blasts in the centre of the Iraqi capital Baghdad.

Reuters quoted police and medics as saying at least 18 people had been killed and at least a further 50 wounded in the explosions.

Iraqi authorities quoted by the Associated Press, though, downscaled the current tolls to a minimum of 12 deaths and 30 injuries. They also confirmed the ensuing gun fights, claiming the battles had been coordinated by the gunmen.

The blasts are said to have occurred near the area of the city which houses the ministries of justice and foreign affairs.

Bomb blasts rip through Baghdad

Bomb blasts killed more than 30 people on Saturday on the second day of the Islamic Eid al Adha religious festival.

Two car bombs destroyed parts of Baghdad's Shi'ite neighbourhood Sadr City and police said a bomb device was also strapped to a bus full of Iranian pilgrims on their way to a shrine.

Residents inspect the aftermath of the bomb in Baghdad.
Residents inspect the aftermath of the bombs in Baghdad. Credit: Thaier Al-Sudani/Reuters

It exploded around 300 metres (yards) from a police checkpoint, sending the bus out of control before it flipped over on its side.

Violence in Iraq has eased in recent times, but Sunni Islamist insurgents and al Qaeda's Iraq wing often target Shi'ites in an attempt to stir up the kind of sectarian tensions that dragged the country close to civil war in 2006-2007.

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