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Protesters gather ahead of Confederations Cup match

by - Brazil Correspondent

There was an international played match here in Brazil at the weekend and the protests descended into violence when police stopped them reaching the stadium.

Today a military police leaflet says: "Protest in peace...Democracy, yes. Vandalism, no."

Read more: Brazil protests 'more localised'

Protesters gather in Belo Horizonte.
Protesters gather in Belo Horizonte. Credit: ITV News/ Nick Ravenscroft

Protesters gathering in Belo Horizonte will march to the stadium where Brazil take on Uruguay in the Confederations Cup later.

Brazil protests expected despite congress climb-down

Brazil's congress has shelved legislation that had been a target of nationwide protests, hours before another expected round of large-scale demonstrations.

Protests in Brazil have become become the largest eruption of public demonstrations Latin America's biggest nation has seen in two decades.

The unrest started almost 10-days ago as a response to public transport costs but the list of grievances has increased and had come to include the controversial plans.

Demonstrators clashing with police close to the Mineirao Stadium in Belo Horizonte on Saturday.
Demonstrators clashing with police close to the Mineirao Stadium in Belo Horizonte on Saturday. Credit: REUTERS/Alexandre C. Mota

The lower house of congress voted 403-9 late last night to drop a measure that would have limited the investigative powers of federal prosecutors, a bill that many feared would make it harder to prosecute official corruption.

However further protests are still expected.

There have been calls on social media calling for more big demonstrations with the largest expected in the city of Belo Horizonte, where the Brazilian football team will meet Uruguay in a semifinal of the Confederations Cup, the warm-up tournament to next year's World Cup.

Read more: President's promises not enough for Brazil protesters

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President's promises not enough for Brazil protesters

Protesters in Brazil decided promises from the President were not enough and so returned to the streets today.

Dilma Rousseff offered a referendum on political change plus better public services and an anti-corruption drive.

While that answers many of their demands, ITV News Brazil Correspondent Nick Ravenscroft reports on why the money being spent on the World Cup is still a bone of contention:

Read more: Brazil protests 'more localised'

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