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Donkey rescued from neck-deep mud by fire crews

A donkey has been rescued by three fire crews after she became trapped up to her neck in mud overnight.

Geraldine pictured with her rescuers after the ordeal.
Geraldine pictured with her rescuers after the ordeal. Credit: Avon Fire and Rescue Service

Firefighters arrived at a field in Clapton-in-Gordano, Bristol, to find only the donkey's head exposed above the earth.

They spent around two hours gradually pulling the 15-year-old animal, called Geraldine, from the mud.

Three fire crews spent around two hours pulling the donkey out from the mud.
Three fire crews spent around two hours pulling the donkey out from the mud. Credit: Avon Fire and Rescue Service

A spokesman for Avon Fire and Rescue Service said, "By the time crews left the scene she had returned to her stable to warm up and have something to eat."

Lawyer to meet with families of children who died

The medical director of NHS England, Professor Sir Bruce Keogh, said that an important meeting took place on Friday with the families of children who died at Bristol.

My deputy medical director Mike Bewick and I have listened with great care to their concerns about the care their children received.

I would like to thank them for the dignified and powerful way they have talked to us.

We collectively concluded that the most effective course of action might be to put in place an independent review of the care at the Trust's paediatric cardiac unit.

It was clear that, in the interests of everyone, such a review would need to be independent of the NHS. It must be led by the families involved. It must be their review.

– medical director of NHS England, Professor Sir Bruce Keogh

Sir Keogh said he had agreed in principle with lawyer Sir Ian Kennedy to take such a review forward should the families wish him to do.

He will now ask Sir Ian to meet the families and to work with them to see if they can come to the "scope and terms of reference that the families want".

Last year it emerged around 10 families were believed to be taking legal action against the trust, including seven whose children died following treatment at the hospital.

Review over alleged neglect at children's hospital

An independent review is to be held into a hospital's paediatric cardiac unit following concern about its treatment of newborn babies and young children who died or suffered complications.

The review is over alleged neglect at Bristol children's hospital Credit: : Dominic Lipinski/PA Wire/Press Association Images

Professor Sir Bruce Keogh, medical director of NHS England, confirmed the inquiry will take place at Bristol Children's Hospital, which is accused of a catalogue of neglect and mistreatment of babies and children with heart problems.

He said Sir Ian Kennedy, a lawyer who specialises in the law and ethics of healthcare, has agreed in principle to oversee the review.

Police search for '6ft crocodile under bridge in Bristol'

Police are on alert after a report of a six foot crocodile apparently under a bridge in Bristol.

Avon and Somerset Police chief constable Nick Gargan tweeted:

Qmf3bmyd_normal

One of our officers was flagged down by a bus driver today, claiming to have seen a 6ft crocodile under Coronation Bridge. We can't find it.

Asked by a tweeter if it means it was on the loose, he replied:

Qmf3bmyd_normal

@princessofvp it may mean precisely that, madam. No need to stay indoors - but you may want to think twice before you go water-skiing.

The force's mounted section also joined in the search:

A mock Twitter account for 'Chris the Croc' already has 400 followers.

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Parts of Bristol submerged by floodwater

One early-morning runner took these photographs of the flooding in Bristol at high tide.

The Environment Agency has issued severe flood warnings for the River Severn area and has deployed flood defences along three sections of the estuary at Frankwell, Bewdley and Ironbridge.

A building cut off by floodwater in Bristol
A building cut off by floodwater in Bristol Credit: Twitter/@SaharaNutter
Flooded railway tracks at Cumberland Basin in Bristol
Flooded railway tracks at Cumberland Basin in Bristol Credit: Twitter/@SaharaNutter
Water cascades past the Pump House pub in Bristol
Water cascades past the Pump House pub in Bristol Credit: Twitter/@SaharaNutter

Read: England and Wales on course for wettest January since 1766

Four-year-old boy Sean Turner's parents demand inquiry

The parents of the four-year-old boy who died after heart surgery have demanded a public inquiry into the care he received on a controversial hospital ward.

The parents of Sean Turner, Steve and Yolanda Turner
The parents of Sean Turner, Steve and Yolanda Turner outside Avon Coroner's Court Credit: Tim Ireland/PA Wire

Steve and Yolanda Turner said they had heard evidence about their son Sean's treatment that was "shocking and unacceptable" and only a public inquiry would unearth the truth.

"Sean suffered a lot of failings in his care. We feel at every level the ward did not recognise his deterioration and that led to the complications that led to his death," said Sean's mother, Yolanda.

Yesterday, at the end of the 10-day inquest Avon coroner Maria Voisin said there were "lost opportunities" in the little boy's care but it did not amount to neglect. Chief executive of the University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust apologised to the Turners and said changes had been made.

"We feel there is much more that needs investigating and the coroner's inquest didn't do that fully," added Yolanda Turner

'Lost opportunities' to help four-year-old Sean Turner

Mum backs call for Bristol hospital inquiry

Emma Norley's daughter, Lacey-Marie Poton, was born with Down Syndrome and heart defects.

Last summer, Lacey-Marie was sent home from the Bristol Royal Children's Hospital when Emma believed she should have been kept in the hospital's in the new high-dependency unit on ward 32.

Emma Norley speaks to ITV News' Medical Editor Lawrence McGinty. Credit: ITV News

Lacey-Marie later died, aged four-months.

Emma told Medical Editor Lawrence McGinty that she agreed with Steve and Yolanda Turner's call for an inquiry into care at the Bristol hospital.

She said: "I thought my daughter should be in high dependency. They were only using two beds when they had four [available in the unit].

Asked why the unit was being underused, she added: "They said there wasn't enough nursing staff."

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