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Three-quarters of children not getting five a day

Britain's children are facing a future of poor health because they are eating junk food and not getting enough exercise, a leading health charity has found.

The report by the British Heart Foundation and Oxford University found:

  • Over three-quarters (80 percent) of children aged five to 15 are not getting their recommended five portions of fruit and veg a day.
  • Around two in five 13-year-olds (39 percent of girls and 43 percent of boys) drink a soft drink every day.
  • At least 85 percent of girls and 73 percent of 13-year-old boys do not do an hour of physical activity every day.
  • Almost three-quarters of 13-year-olds (68 percent of girls and 74 percent of boys) watch at least two hours of TV on a weekday.
  • A quarter of children under 15 spend at least six hours every weekend day being inactive.

Fraudsters fine travel arrangements 'attractive' targets

Mark Tanzer, CEO the Association of British Travel Agents said, fraudsters find travel arrangements "attractive" targets because of the large sums of money involved, and the time lapse between the booking and the holiday. He added:

Its particularly distressing for people when they might save up for months or even years for their holiday, or to visit family overseas, only to discover the flight or hotel doesnt exist. Many are left devastated as they cannot afford another holiday. You should always check a companys credentials before you book and if a deal looks too good to be true it probably is.

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New advert launched to fight heart disease in the UK

The British Heart Foundation is calling on people across the UK to fight back against heart disease.

The charity has launched a new national campaign which brings together heart patients and scientists to talk about the research which is needed to fight the disease.

The moving TV advert also features the moment that footballer Fabrice Muamba suffered from an on pitch cardiac arrest.

North of the UK has higher death rate for heart disease

New figures from the British Heart Foundation have revealed the inequalities in deaths from heart disease across the country.

Worst heart health towns in the UK (2009 to 2011):

  • Tameside, Greater Manchester has a death rate of 132
  • Ballymoney, Northern Ireland has a death rate of 129
  • Glasgow, Scotland has a death rate of 128
  • Blackburn with Darwen, NW England has a death rate of 127
  • West Dunbartonshire, Scotland has a death rate of 124

Best heart health town in the UK (2009 to 2011):

  • Kensington and Chelsea, London has a death rate of 39

Britain's 'heart disease capital' revealed

Coronary heart disease remains the single biggest killer in the UK.

New figures from the British Heart Foundation have today revealed the staggering inequalities in deaths from heart disease across the country.

The British Heart FOundation has launched a new campaign to fight heart disease Credit: British Heart Foundation

Tameside in Greater Manchester is the UK's "heart disease capital", with the risk of heart disease more than three times higher than in Kensington and Chelsea in London, where people have the healthiest hearts.

Every year in Tameside, there are 132 deaths per every 100,000 people, while in the London borough the figure stands at just 39 per 100,000, a BHF spokesperson said.

Heart charity welcomes plans to ban cigarette branding

The British Heart Foundation's director of policy and communications, Betty McBride, said: "Tobacco advertising is rightly banned in the UK, yet current glitzy packaging clearly still advertises tobacco on the cigarette box.

"It's an absurd loophole the tobacco industry takes full advantage of to lure in new young smokers."

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Watchdog clears Vinnie Jones CPR advert

A British Heart Foundation (BHF) advert featuring actor Vinnie Jones carrying out CPR has been cleared following complaints that he performs the technique incorrectly, the Advertising Standards Authority has ruled.

The BHF said the campaign aimed to increase bystander intervention in events of cardiac arrest, adding that they knew of 15 reported instances of people applying lessons from the advert with a positive outcome.

The "appalling" survival rates for out-of-hospital cardiac arrests in the UK showed fewer than 10% of these casualties survived, but research had found people were more likely to start CPR if they only had to carry out the "hands-only" version, the foundation said.

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