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'Far too many' adults not 'taking bullying seriously'

Too many adults are failing to recognise the consequence of bullying because they "don't take it seriously" and still see it as "part of growing up", a charity chief has warned.

Emma-Jane Cross, CEO and founder of Beat Bullying said:

Far too many European citizens still see bullying as part of growing up and don't take it seriously.

This is pushing young people to the brink with some even resorting to harming themselves in order to cope.

How many more children have to tragically lose their lives before these outdated perceptions change?

– Emma-Jane Cross

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55% of bullied children 'developed depression'

More than half of children who are the victims of bullying developed depression as a result of the abuse, according to a survey.

Beat Bullying will be launching an online protest, the Big March, today. Credit: PA

Beat Bullying quizzed 2,000 parents and adults across Europe and found a further 35% of victims began harming themselves and 38% contemplated suicide.

However, the same poll exposed a large minority of adults who consider bullying just part of growing up.

Some 34% thought school yard abuse was inevitable and 16% regarded it as character building.

Adults need to stop thinking of bullying as 'inevitable'

Adults in charge need to "move away" from the belief bullying is "an inevitable part of growing up" because the long-term repercussions are so severe, according to the authors of a report into the psychological affects of school yard abuse.

Senior author Professor Louise Arseneault, also from the Institute of Psychiatry at King's College, said:

We need to move away from any perception that bullying is just an inevitable part of growing up.

Teachers, parents and policy-makers should be aware that what happens in the school playground can have long-term repercussions for children.

Programmes to stop bullying are extremely important, but we also need to focus our efforts on early intervention to prevent potential problems persisting into adolescence and adulthood.

– Louise Arseneault

Victims of school bullying still had scars 'after 40 years'

Some children who are bullied at school still feel the effects nearly 40 years after the initial abuse, a study has found.

The scars of childhood bullying leave lingering scars, the report warned. Photo posed by a model. Credit: PA

People who suffered bullying as seven and 11-year-olds were disadvantaged physically, psychologically and mentally at age 50, researchers at Kings College London found.

Adults who were victims of childhood bullying are at greater risk of depression, anxiety and suicidal thoughts.

They also had greater difficulty maintaining relationship and had poor academic results.

They also earned less, were more likely to be unemployed, and were in poorer health than those who escaped bullying.

MoD facing legal action over alleged bullying

An ex-private says he attempted suicide several times after his complains about being bullied were ignored by the army.

Joseph McCabe is taking civil legal action against the Ministry of Defence for its alleged failure to act, the BBC reported, as well as appealing against a decision to deny him financial compensation. He said:

I'm still having nightmares, I'm still having flashbacks. If I could I would lock myself up in a box and just hide away. But if I do that it's like I'm letting those people in the Army win so I have forced myself to take up a new career, to rebuild my life.

He said that he received death threats and was stabbed in the leg at the height of constant abuse centred on his stutter but that officers laughed off the threats and no-one was punished. The Ministry of Defence responded:

Whilst we can't comment on individual cases, we can be clear that the armed forces have a zero-tolerance policy towards all forms of bullying, discrimination and abuse.

All allegations will be fully investigated either by the civil or the military police and appropriate action will be taken.

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Surge in online and racist bullying, Childline says

The children's support service Childline has reported a surge in the number of children contacting them about online bullying.

More than 1,400 young people said they were experiencing racist bullying, up 69% on the previous year.

The charity's founder Esther Rantzen said these findings are a wake up call.

A common theme was for young people to be called a "terrorist" or a "bomber" and to be told to "go back to where they came from," Ms Rantzen said.

The 24-hour phone and online support service also reported number of contacts from suicidal young people increased by a third in a year.

Gove: Using 'gay' as insult is 'outrageous and medieval'

Education Secretary Michael Gove has condemned the use of the word 'gay' as an insult in schools.

Speaking at a education conference run by gay rights group Stonewall, Mr Gove said he thought that “language in playgrounds that wasn’t effectively policed.”

“It’s utterly outrageous and medieval to think that to use the word gay as an insult is somehow acceptable,” he said.

Conference attendees said the politician was challenged by singer Will Young over the handling of homophobic bullying in schools:

Survey: One in five NHS workers bullied at work

One in five NHS workers said they have been bullied by colleagues and almost half reported they have witnessed bullying in the last six months, according to a new survey.

Managers were the worst offenders, with increasing workloads and the workplace culture contributory factors, the study published in the online journal BMJ Open said. The study found:

  • Almost 20% of respondents had been bullied by colleagues within the past six months, ranging from rarely to daily
  • 43% had witnessed other staff being bullied occasionally in the past six months, with 5% witnessing it weekly or daily
  • Only 2.7%-14% of staff reported bullying to someone in authority

Almost 3,000 NHS staff who work in a range of roles at seven trusts across the North East of England answered a questionnaire for the study by Professor Jan Illing of Durham University.

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