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'Far too many' adults not 'taking bullying seriously'

Too many adults are failing to recognise the consequence of bullying because they "don't take it seriously" and still see it as "part of growing up", a charity chief has warned.

Emma-Jane Cross, CEO and founder of Beat Bullying said:

Far too many European citizens still see bullying as part of growing up and don't take it seriously.

This is pushing young people to the brink with some even resorting to harming themselves in order to cope.

How many more children have to tragically lose their lives before these outdated perceptions change?

– Emma-Jane Cross

55% of bullied children 'developed depression'

More than half of children who are the victims of bullying developed depression as a result of the abuse, according to a survey.

Beat Bullying will be launching an online protest, the Big March, today. Credit: PA

Beat Bullying quizzed 2,000 parents and adults across Europe and found a further 35% of victims began harming themselves and 38% contemplated suicide.

However, the same poll exposed a large minority of adults who consider bullying just part of growing up.

Some 34% thought school yard abuse was inevitable and 16% regarded it as character building.

Adults need to stop thinking of bullying as 'inevitable'

Adults in charge need to "move away" from the belief bullying is "an inevitable part of growing up" because the long-term repercussions are so severe, according to the authors of a report into the psychological affects of school yard abuse.

Senior author Professor Louise Arseneault, also from the Institute of Psychiatry at King's College, said:

We need to move away from any perception that bullying is just an inevitable part of growing up.

Teachers, parents and policy-makers should be aware that what happens in the school playground can have long-term repercussions for children.

Programmes to stop bullying are extremely important, but we also need to focus our efforts on early intervention to prevent potential problems persisting into adolescence and adulthood.

– Louise Arseneault
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