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Older women 'still at risk of cervical cancer'

Recent reports point to an increase in women having new partners' later in life and this will increase their risk of contracting HPV.

However, even if this is not the case, typically cervical cancer is a slow growing cancer which usually takes 10 to 15 years to develop, so women who have not been sexually active for some time may still be at risk.

– Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust director Robert Music.

Cervical cancer: Facts and figures

  • Every year in the UK, over 3,000 women will be diagnosed with cervical cancer and nearly 1,000 women will die from the disease.
  • Cervical cancer is the most common cancer in women aged 35 and under.
  • Cervical cancer is not thought to be hereditary.
  • Cervical cancer, in 99.7% of cases, is caused by persistent infection with a virus called human papillomavirus (HPV).
  • Around 4 out of 5 people (80%) will be infected with HPV at some point in their lives.
  • However, for the majority of women this will not result in cervical cancer.
  • Cervical cancer is rare while HPV infection is common.
  • Cervical screening is the process of taking a sample of cells from your cervix which are then examined to detect abnormalities that might develop into cancer in the future.

Visit www.jostrust.org.uk for more information about cervical cancer

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A third of women in their late 20s 'miss smear test'

  • Uptake of smear tests in women aged 60 to 64 is at a 15 year low.
  • One in every three women aged 25 to 29 will ignore or delay their invitation to be screened.
  • The uptake among women aged 60 to 64 fell to 72.7% in 2012, a drop of 5.3% from its peak in 2007.
  • Only 63% of younger women attended a screening last year.

Source: Jo's Cervical Cancer

Cancer warning over missed smear tests

The number of women taking a smear test to detect early signs of cervical cancer has declined, a charity has warned.

Uptake of smear tests in women has declined, the charity has warned. Credit: PA

Jo's Cervical Cancer has warned that the uptake of smear tests in women aged 60 to 64 is at a 15 year low.

The charity also said it was troubled about the number of younger women who do not attend cervical screenings.

One in every three women aged 25 to 29 will ignore or delay their invitation to be screened, a spokeswoman said.

Screening for Cervical Cancer

Testing for cervical cancer among women in England has fallen to a 10-year low, a cancer charity said.

The charity said many feel the screening is not necessary or relevant to them, while others are unaware of the causes, symptoms and ways to prevent the cancer.

Some women miss or delay tests because of work commitments, while others book time off work because they are too embarrassed to discuss it with their bosses.

Samme Allen, 37, tells Daybreak how she waited ten years before being tested.

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Cervcal Cancer screening plea

A charity is urging women to attend their cervical screening tests, after figures showed one in four did not take up their invitation to attend an appointment.

Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust is making the plea as part of national Cervical Screening Awareness Week.

  • Testing for cervical cancer among women in England has fallen to a 10-year low, a cancer charity said.
  • Despite cervical screening saving 5,000 lives every year in the UK, 20% of women are not being tested.
  • Almost 69% of women aged between 25 and 29 missed their screening invitation in 2010/11, while 23% of women aged between 50 and 60 also failed to get screened last year, according to the charity.

Cervical cancer: Jade Goody effect wears off

Jade Goody
Jade Goody died of cervical cancer at the age of 27 Credit: Ian West/PA

Over the last decade the number of women being tested for the cancer has fallen, despite a dramatic rise in 2009 following the death of Big Brother star Jade Goody from the disease.

The 'Jade Goody effect' saw more than 400,000 women in England tested for cervical cancer between mid-2008 and mid-2009.

Now fewer than 80% of women take up the screening - more than one in five women between the ages of 25 and 64 and one in three under 35 are not being tested.

Women over 50 being screened dropped below 80% for the first time in 2010 and fell even further last year.

Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust said some women found the screening unnecessary or not relevant to them.

Health chiefs urge for more cervical cancer screenings

Testing for cervical cancer among women in England has fallen to a 10-year low, a cancer charity said.

Despite cervical screening saving 5,000 lives every year in the UK, 20% of women are not being tested.

The charity said many feel the screening is not necessary or relevant to them, while others are unaware of the causes, symptoms and ways to prevent the cancer.

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