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Failing to collect data 'devastating impact' on neglect

The Department for Education has admitted that councils need to gather information to spot early signs of neglect, after a report suggested around 60% of local authorities were missing key structures to address the situation.

We agree that councils need to gather information to spot the early signs of neglect, which can have devastating consequences for the most vulnerable.

[We] are overhauling the training and evaluation of social workers to give trainees the expertise they need to tackle neglect. We have also given the NSPCC over £11 million to run a comprehensive 24/7 advice and reporting service for those who have concerns about a child, and are developing training materials with the sector to help improve practice in this area.

– Spokeswoman, Department for Education

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Families need help early 'to stop child neglect'

Lack of information gathering is putting children's lives at further risk, the chief executive of Action for Children has said, after a report from the charity suggested that around 60% of councils did not have adequate systems in place to give early warning signs over whether youngsters are being neglected.

This is unacceptable when we know more can be done - we cannot allow the suffering of any child. Neglect can be stopped in its tracks.

Families need help as early as possible so they can make positive changes in their lives, transforming their and their children's stories by being the best parents they can be.

– Sir Tony Hawkhead, Action for Children chief executive

Councils 'unaware' of how many children 'neglected'

Many councils do not know how many children in their area are likely to suffer from neglect, according to a charity.

New research by Action for Children suggests that around 60% of local authorities do not have systems in place to collect information that would give early warning signs that youngsters are being neglected.

Councils 'unaware' of how many children 'neglected' in their area Credit: ITV News

Gathering this information can help councils ensure that children and families get help to prevent future problems, the charity said.

Data obtained from 80 English councils through a Freedom of Information request made by Action for Children found 48 (60%) said other than statistics on the number of children known to them through child protection plans, they used no other mechanisms to find out how many youngsters in their area are at risk or experiencing neglect. No London councils were approached as part of the FoI request.

Eight children aged 12 and 13 disqualified from driving

Eight children aged 12 or 13-years-old are among those who are disqualified from driving, according to figures from the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency.

The children are just a few of the 230 people under the age of 17 who are currently disqualified.

Eight children aged 12 and 13 are currently disqualified from driving Credit: Andrew Parsons/PA Archive/Press Association Images

The figures were supplied by the following a Freedom of Information Act request made by the Institute of Advanced Motorists.

  • They showed that 92,136 people in the UK were disqualified from driving between July 2013 and June 2014
  • Of those about 62,000 are still disqualified
  • As many as 36,001 of the 92,136 were in the 20-30 age range
  • Only 3,874 of the disqualifications involved drivers in their 60s and only 15% involved women motorists

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Child maintenance fees 'give stronger incentive to pay'

New child maintenance fees will force parents trying to get out of paying for their youngster to cough up, a work and pensions minister has told Good Morning Britain.

Steve Webb dismissed claims the Government would make money by charging rowing parents for use of the child maintenance service, and said the fees were about "getting people to pay to benefit children".

Minister: Child Support Agency 'not fit for purpose'

The Government is phasing out the Child Support Agency (CSA) as it is "not fit for purpose", Work and Pensions minister Steve Webb has said.

"The old CSA was just not fit for purpose - it spent £503 million in one year to transfer £1.1bn of maintenance and left more than 50% of children living in separated families with no effective financial arrangement in place at all," Mr Webb said.

Steve Webb was critical of the Child Support Agency's performance. Credit: David Jones/PA Wire/Press Association Images

He said the new Child Maintenance System (CMS) would encourage separated parents to agree together on how to provide for their children.

Under the new regime, parents who fail to come up with an agreement face fees for using the CMS, while there are also charges for absent parents who try to avoid paying maintenance.

£300 fine for late child maintenance payments

Parents who have to be pursued through the courts or have child maintenance payments deducted from their wages will risk a charge of £300 under a new child support system that comes into force today.

Parents will also face fees if they cannot come to an amicable arrangement on supporting their children financially.

The new system means the Child Support Agency (CSA) will be phased out over the next three years and replaced with the Child Maintenance Service (CMS).

Letters have already been sent to 50,000 parents in England, Scotland and Wales earlier this year warning them of the changes.

Parents risk fees if they fail to agree on child support

Separated parents will be hit by charges if they cannot come to an agreement over child support for their children under a new system coming into force today.

Parents who turn to the Child Maintenance Service (CMS) to collect and pay settlements will face hefty fees.

The parent not living full-time with their children will face a 20% surcharge on top of their support payment, while the other parent faces losing 4% of the money they would normally receive.

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