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Vladimir Putin says the internet is a 'CIA project'

Russian President Vladimir Putin has warned Ukraine against using the army on its own population Credit: Reuters

Russian President Vladimir Putin has derided the internet as a Central Intelligence Agency project and has pledged to protect Russia's interests online.

According to the Associated Press, Putin mocked the World Wide Web at a media forum in St. Petersburg, claiming that it was "originally a CIA project" and is "still developing as such".

The Kremlin has long sought greater controls over the internet as many opposition activists, who are banned from state media, use the medium to promote their views and organise protests.

Read: Russia blocks Ukraine protest websites

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Senate decision welcomed by alleged CIA torture victim

ITV News has obtained a statement from former Libyan opposition politician Abdel Hakim Belhadj, who claims he was tortured by the CIA and says British authorities were aware of it.

My wife and I welcome the decision to declassify this report.

She and I were tortured at a CIA black site in Bangkok before being shipped to one of Gaddafi's most notorious prisons.

At the time my wife was several months pregnant. Later we were shocked to learn the UK was also involved in the plot.

We have promised one another not to rest until we find justice - not for vengeance's sake, but for the sake of the new democracy we fought so hard for.

– Abdel Hakim Belhadj

US Senator: CIA report exposes 'shocking brutality'

ITV News Washington bureau editor Matt Williams tweeted the comments from Democratic Senator Dianne Feinstein, the chair of the Senate intelligence committee, about the decision to declassify the report into the CIA:

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Sen Dianne Feinstein: 'The purpose of the report was to uncover the facts behind this secret programme. The results were shocking.'

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Sen Feinstein: 'The report exposes brutality that stands in stark contrast to our values as a nation'.

Dianne Feinstein is chair of the Senate Intelligence Committee.

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Congress to be shown CIA-approved Damascus video

Members of US Congress are to be shown a 13-minute video compilation of CIA-verified footage showing the victims of a chemical attack on eastern Damascas.

Senate Intelligence Committee chairwoman Dianne Feinstein said her committee was shown the "grim and ghoulish" video yesterday.

A boy fights for his life in the aftermath of a chemical attack on eastern Damascus. Credit: whitehouse.gov

The 13-minute video is available to watch on senate.gov but viewers are advised that the footage contains some extremely distressing scenes.

Robert Moore: CIA videos more likely to sway opinion than Assad clips

CIA videos more likely to sway opinion than Assad clips

by - Washington Correspondent

Assad's CBS interview is unlikely to make any difference among the people and policymakers in America.

Much more significant here is the 13 CIA-verified videos, which have just been released, of the chemicals weapons attack on the outskirts of Damascus.

Some of those are extremely harrowing and today those videos are being shown to all members of Congress. That is much more likely to sway opinion.

It is in many ways the secret weapon of the lobbying effort now underway by the White House.

Apple denies that it was involved in NSA programme

Apple have released a statement refuting claims that it was involved in the NSA's controversial PRISM programme.

In the statement titled "Apple's Commitment to Customer Privacy", Apple claim that it does not "provide any government agency with direct access to our servers, and insisted that "any government agency requesting customer content must get a court order".

Apple did confirm that it did received between "4,000 and 5,000" requests for customer data from government agencies.
Apple did confirm that it did received between "4,000 and 5,000" requests for customer data from government agencies. Credit: REUTERS/Mike Segar

However the company did confirm that it received between "4,000 and 5,000" requests for customer data from government agencies.

The Guardian published a series of revelations earlier this month, concerning allegations that the US security services monitored phone calls and internet data through large companies.

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