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US removes Cuba from state sponsors of terror list

The US and Cuba are working together to restore diplomatic ties. Credit: Reuters/Stringer

The US has formally dropped Cuba from a list of state sponsors of terrorism as the country continues efforts to restore diplomatic ties with the Communist-ruled island.

President Barack Obama had announced on April 14th he would drop the former Cold War rival from the list, initiating a 45-day review period for Congress that expired today.

Obama ordered a review of Cuba's status on the terrorism list as part of a landmark policy shift.

The move followed a meeting in December between the US President and Cuba's leader Raul Castro where they announced they would seek to restore diplomatic relations that Washington severed in 1961, and work toward a broader normalisation of ties.

Cuba had cited its listing as a state terrorism sponsor, which had been in place since 1982, as an obstacle to the re-establishing of diplomatic relations.

The two sides have held four rounds of high level negotiations since December and say they are closing in on a deal to reopen embassies in Havana and Washington.

Pope meets Castro ahead of Cuba visit

Pope Francis has met with Cuban President Raul Castro today, ahead of his planned visit to the island nation later this year.

Pope Francis has met with Cuban President Raul Castro Credit: REUTERS/Gregorio

The pope granted Castro a rare Sunday audience at the Vatican as the Cuban President passed through Rome on his way back from Moscow.

Although the issues discussed by the Pope and Castro during their meeting were not disclosed the pontiff could be heard telling his visitor there was a "need to work together to fight poverty around the world" during a subsequent photo call.

Cuba: 'Fair decision' by Obama over terrorist states list

Cuba recognised what it called a "fair decision" by US President Barack Obama to inform Congress he intends to remove Cuba from a US list of state sponsors of terrorism.

Cuban President Raul Castro with US President Barack Obama. Credit: Reuters

"The Cuban government recognised the fair decision made by the president of the United States to eliminate Cuba from a list that it never should have been included on, especially considering our country has been the victim of hundreds of acts of terrorism that have cost 3,478 lives and maimed 2,099 citizens," said the statement by Josefina Vidal, the Cuban foreign ministry's chief of US affairs.

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Obama and Castro in phone call ahead of symbolic meeting

US President Barack Obama has already spoken with Cuban President Raul Castro ahead of their symbolic meeting in Panama.

A Cuban official confirmed the two leaders shared a phone call on Wednesday as the countries work to mend once bitter Cold War relations.

President Obama met Raul Castro briefly at the funeral of Nelson Mandela in December 2013. Credit: Reuters/Kai Pfaffenbach

Mr Obama and Mr Castro, who have only previously met briefly and informally, will share the same stage with other leaders at a regional summit in Panama later today.

It is the first time a US president has held a formal meeting with a Cuban leader since Mr Castro's older brother Fidel Castro toppled US-backed dictator Fulgencio Batista in a 1959 revolution.

Obama told Cuba 'should be removed from US terror list'

Cuba should be removed from the United States' list of state sponsors of terrorism, a White House aide has revealed.

The US State Department made the recommendations to President Barack Obama.

Speaking during a trip to Jamaica, Obama said he was awaiting advice from his personal aides and would not make a decision immediately.

Removing Cuba from the list is seen as clearing a major obstacle in restoring diplomatic relations between the two countries after more than 50 years of hostility.

Fidel Castro appears to approve US talks in letter

Former Cuban leader Fidel Castro appears approve his nation's talks with the US in a letter published on the website of Cuba's Communist Party newspaper Granma.

A student reads from the letter attributed to former Cuban leader Fidel Castro Credit: Reuters

The 88-year-old is quoted as saying: "I don't trust the policy of the United States nor have I had an exchange with them, but this does not mean ... a rejection of a peaceful solution to conflicts or the dangers of war."

Cuba's current president Raul Castro has been holding high-level talks with the US government since the two countries announced a rapprochement on 17th December.

Fidel Castro was forced into retirement in 2008 by poor health and was succeeded by his brother Raul, who is now 83.

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