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PM: 'Easier to be Jewish or Muslim' in UK

It is "easier to be Jewish or Muslim" in the UK than some secular countries, according to the Prime Minister.

David Cameron set out his Christian beliefs in an article for the Church Times and defended his faith by arguing that "tolerance" was one of its core values.

Many people tell me it is easier to be Jewish or Muslim in Britain than in a secular country precisely because the tolerance that Christianity demands of our society provides greater space for other religious faiths, too.

Crucially, the Christian values of responsibility, hard work, charity, compassion, humility, and love are shared by people of every faith and none - and we should be confident in standing up to defend them.

Read: UK should 'be more confident' about Christianity

UK should 'be more confident' about Christianity

David Cameron has called on the UK to be "more confident about our status as a Christian country" ahead of the Easter weekend.

Read: Former Archbishop attacks PM

David Cameron
The PM said Christian's should not be afraid to discuss their faith publicly in a secular age. Credit: PA

Read: Religious leaders warn Cameron

In an article for the Church Times, the Prime Minister insisted that being a Christian country did not mean "doing down" other religions or "passing judgment" on those with no faith at all.

The leader of the Conservative party was speaking after the Government's welfare reforms came under attack from members of the senior clergy.

However, Mr Cameron said "we all believe in many of the same principles" and churches were "vital partners".

Read: 27 bishops and 16 clergy 'attack coalition welfare policy'

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Elderly and seriously ill to get 'tailored GP care'

The Prime Minister has added to his bid to extend GP hours with plans to enhance care services for the elderly.

David Cameron said that around 800,000 people over the age of 75 and those with more serious health complaints will get tailored care, coordinated by just one local GP.

Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt said the move is "one of the biggest changes that we need to make in our NHS".

I want to make sure this is completely coordinated to head off problems and keep people from going to hospital unnecessarily.

– Jeremy Hunt

GP hours extension 'needs to be properly supported'

David Cameron's extensions to GP hours have been praised by NHS England, but a British Medical Association committee chair has said the changes must be properly supported.

Stethoscope
Patients at 1,147 GP practices across England will be able to see their family doctor outside of working hours. Credit: PA

NHS England CEO Simon Stevens said the initiative could also free up time for GPs to spend with their sickest patients, giving it "the potential to be a win-win-win for patients, their doctors and the NHS".

But Dr Chaand Nagpaul, chair of the British Medical Association's General Practice Committee, said a more holistic approach was needed "so that community, social and urgent care work in tandem".

He also said ministers must "deliver on their commitment to increase resources in the community," so that GPs can be properly supported.

Cameron to extend GP hours for millions

More than 7.5 million people will be able to see their GP outside work hours, David Cameron has announced.

David Cameron
David Cameron said there had been a "great response from doctors". Credit: PA

The Prime Minister said that extended opening times, video-phone services, email and phone would all contribute to the increased access.

Although it was originally thought that only half a million people would benefit, the £50 million GP Access Fund will now affect over 1,000 practices across England.

Mr Cameron said that since announcing in October that he wanted to help make appointments more flexible, there had been "a great response from doctors, with lots of innovative ideas".

Cameron 'to take Easter break in Lanzarote'

David Cameron is reportedly jetting off to the Canary Islands for Parliament's Easter break.

The Prime Minister is expected fly to Lanzarote this weekend with his wife Samantha and their three children.

David and Samantha Cameron relaxing in Ibiza last year Credit: Stefan Rousseau/PA Wire/Press Association Images

It will not be the first time the Camerons have holidayed on a Spanish island - they have previously taken trips to Ibiza and Mallorca.

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PM will try and put Miller row behind him with campaign

David Cameron will hope questions about his handling of the Maria Miller expenses row will not overshadow the launch of the Conservatives campaign for next month's European elections.

Former Culture Secretary Maria Miller. Credit: Yui Mok/PA Archive

Watch: Nigel Farage says 'Miller's resignation not enough'

Mrs Miller resigned from her position as Culture Secretary yesterday after sustained pressure over the disclosure she had wrongly claimed thousands of pounds in mortgage interest payments.

She was also criticised for her 32-second House of Commons apology.

The Prime Minister repeatedly defended her but admitted the party had experienced a "difficult week" and said he under-estimated the depth of the "raw" public anger over MPs' expenses.

Read: Coincidence? Two Osborne allies criticised Maria Miller

Over half of public think Miller's behaviour 'typical'

Over half the public (53%) think Maria Miller's behaviour in relation to her expenses is "typical of most or all MPs", a new ITV News/ComRes poll has found.

Maria Miller's apology to MPs was criticised for being only 32 seconds long Credit: PA/PA Wire/Press Association Images

The survey of 1,000 adults also found the controversy had made 49% of people trust politicians less.

Poll: 88% think Maria Miller was right to resign

The vast majority of the public (88%) think Maria Miller was right to resign as Culture Secretary, according to a new ITV News/ComRes poll.

Exactly the same proportion of Conservative voters said they supported the resignation.

The vast majority of the public think Maria Miller was right to resign, according to a poll Credit: Stefan Rousseau/PA Wire/Press Association Images

However a similar number (82%) said the Basingstoke MP should have stepped down from her cabinet role once the report into her expenses had been made public.

Irish president meets Cameron in Downing Street

Irish President Michael D Higgins met Prime Minister David Cameron in Downing Street today as he began day two of his state visit to Britain.

Prime Minister David Cameron and Irish President Michael D. Higgins shake hands in Downing Street.
Prime Minister David Cameron and Irish President Michael D. Higgins shake hands in Downing Street. Credit: Jeff Moore/Jeff Moore/Empics Entertainment
Ireland's flag seen atop the Irish president's car outside Number 10.
Ireland's flag seen atop the Irish president's car outside Number 10. Credit: Jeff Moore/Jeff Moore/Empics Entertainment
Irish President Michael D Higgins speaks with Prime Minister David Cameron in Number 10.
Irish President Michael D Higgins speaks with Prime Minister David Cameron in Number 10. Credit: Lefteris Pitarakis/PA Wire/Press Association Images
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