Live updates

PM to face questions on plans to ban British jihadis

The Prime Minister will be grilled on controversial plans to block suspected jihadis from returning to the UK at a committee meeting today.

David Cameron will face the Liaison Committee to answer questions on the government's efforts to tackle the threat posed by Islamist extremists.

Nansen Primary School in Birmingham was among those named in the 'Trojan Horse' allegations Credit: PA

It is expected that he will also be quizzed on the 'Trojan Horse' allegations of extremism in Birmingham schools, and on the Terrorism Prevention and Investigation Measures (Tpims) regime, which is being beefed up with revived powers to relocate suspects across the country.

Climate change and energy policy are among the other items on the agenda.

Cameron and Irish premier leave Belfast with no deal

David Cameron and Taoiseach Enda Kenny have left talks in Belfast aimed at agreeing a financial settlement for the future funding of the power-sharing Executive.

The pair spent last night discussing a range of issues that have caused the Executive to fail to reach an agreement over proposed funding cuts as part of the government's welfare reforms. Items discussed included flags, parades, how Northern Ireland should deal with the past and the reform of the Assembly.

Unionist and Republican politicians in Northern Ireland refused to sign up to Cameron's package of reforms.

ITV News Correspondent Martin Geissler reports from Belfast:

Advertisement

Cameron: No Northern Ireland deal at the moment

David Cameron has left political talks in Northern Ireland conceding that no deal is possible at the moment.

David Cameron with Taoiseach Enda Kenny. Credit: Brian Lawless/PA Wire

The Prime Minister said he had tabled a financial package amounting to £1 billion but that would only be made available to the Executive if an agreement can be reached on outstanding disputes.

Many of the region's politicians are unhappy at the scale of the financial offer made, with some describing it as "derisory".

Gerry Adams criticises talks as NI budget deal fails

Sinn Féin leader Gerry Adams has criticised talks that have failed to reach an agreement to rescue the Northern Ireland executive from a budgetary black hole.

David Cameron and his Irish counterpart Taoiseach Enda Kenny said good progress was made but deal has not been possible.

Cameron proposes Northern Ireland financial package

The Prime Minister has proposed a potential financial package for consideration by Northern Ireland politicians involved in marathon cross-party talks, Downing Street sources have said.

David Cameron with An Taoiseach Enda Kenny. Credit: Brian Lawless/PA Wire

The package was tabled alongside an amended Heads of Agreement document - outlining the state of negotiations on all of the issues - presented by David Cameron and Irish Taoiseach Enda Kenny in the early hours of this morning. Talks will resume today, before Mr Cameron leaves Northern Ireland earlier than planned at 10am.

In the early hours of Friday the Prime Minister and the Taoiseach presented an amended Heads of Agreement document to parties taking part in the talks at Stormont House; additionally the Prime Minister tabled a potential financial package to the parties for them to consider overnight.

The PM informed the parties he would be returning for further talks on Friday morning before departing Northern Ireland at 10am.

– Number 10 sources

UK intelligence agencies 'requested CIA report redaction'

The UK did request that parts of the Senate report into the CIA be redacted. Elements which referred to British intelligence agencies were deleted, Downing Street has confirmed the Guardian reports.

Number 10 had previously said that they only deleted items were due to national security concerns.

The U-turn will fuel speculation over how much the part US allies played in some aspects has been sanitised.

Advertisement

'Little sign of breakthrough' in Stormont talks

David Cameron is in Belfast for talks with Northern Ireland's political leaders to try to save Stormont's power-sharing administration.

His Irish counterpart Enda Kenny is also there for talks that are expected to last into tomorrow as there appears to be little sign of a breakthrough.

ITV News Correspondent Martin Geissler reports:

Much at stake in Northern Ireland negotiations

David Cameron is in Belfast for talks with Northern Irish politicians over resolving long-running disputes in the region.

The issues at stake include flying of flags, parades and the legacy of the past.

The risks of failure are potentially high - with the possibility that the power-sharing Northern Ireland Executive could fall apart.

ITV News Correspondent Martin Geissler reports.

McGuinness calls for extra funding for Northern Ireland

Deputy First Minister Martin McGuinness has said the British government must provide more money for Northern Ireland because it faces "special problems" not shared by other parts of the UK.

The veteran Sinn Fein politician said all five parties in the Northern Ireland Executive agreed that the region needs more funding.

Speaking outside Stormont House ahead of multi-party talks, Mr McGuinness said:

We have reached agreement on what this British Government needs to do in budgetary terms...We are a society emerging from conflict and legacy of all of that has posed huge problems for our Executive, not least in terms of how we bring our community together, how we build a united community, how we increase sharing in education, how we deal with the whole reconciliation process - special problems that aren't faced by any other region in these islands.

– Martin McGuinness

PM: Northern Irish people 'want politicians to deliver'

David Cameron with Irish Taoiseach Enda Kenny at Stormont House. Credit: Brian Lawless/PA Wire

David Cameron has urged Northern Ireland's politicians strike a deal on outstanding disputes for the sake of the region's people.

The Prime Minister is in Belfast with Irish Taoiseach Enda Kenny to join negotiations with the five parties in the Northern Irish Executive.

As well as long-standing disputes over flags, parades and the legacy of the past, the parties in the power-sharing coalition are trying to reach consensus on budget problems facing Northern Ireland's institutions.

"We have got to demonstrate we can resolve these issues," the Prime Minister said outside Stormont House.

"The people inside this room will be discussing and talking about them but the people outside the room, they are the people that matter. They want to see their politicians deliver."

Load more updates