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David Davis vows to set out 'strategic plans' for Brexit

Brexit minister David Davis. Credit: PA

Brexit Secretary David Davis has promised MPs that the Government will set out its "strategic plans" ahead of the triggering of talks on withdrawal from the EU, but said it will not reveal anything which might "jeopardise our negotiating position".

Mr Davis faced calls from opposition MPs and some Conservative backbenchers that the plan must be detailed enough to withstand scrutiny in the Commons before the planned triggering of Article 50 at the end of March 2017.

Former chancellor and remain supporter Kenneth Clarke said the Prime Minister's plan to reveal her plan was "extremely vague", and called for it to be set out in detail in a White Paper for publication before the UK begins to leave the EU.

However, Mr Davis insisted the Government must leave "room for manoeuvre" to respond with "a high degree of agility and speed" to developments in extremely complex negotiations expected to last two years.

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Davis: 'Let's make Britain greater still'

David Davis, the minister in charge of Britain leaving the European Union, finished his speech at the Conservative Party conference with the words "let's make Britain greater still".

"We're the fifth largest economy in the world," he said, mentioning the prevalence of the English language across the world, and saying Britain is key to the security of Europe.

Davis also addressed immigration to the UK, saying it wouldn't be fully halted because "we must win the global competition for talent."

However, he said that numbers must be brought down, while accusing Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn of being out of touch for failing to acknowledge this as a necessity.

"The clear message from the referendum is this: We must control immigration", he said.

He added that the UK will still want to retain the "freest possible trade" between the UK and EU.

David Davis: We won't turn our back on Europe

David Davis speaking at the Conservative party conference in Birmingham. Credit: PA

The minister in charge of leaving the European Union has said that negotiations should be approached in a "spirit of goodwill" and a good relationship with the EU is in the UK's interests.

Speaking at the Conservative Party conference, David Davis said that while the UK had never been comfortable about being part of a "political project", Britain must acknowledge and respect what the EU means to other member states.

Davis said other European countries had historically had more need to be part of the EU. "We were the world's greatest liberal democracy for over a century before we joined," he said.

He added that the UK won't turn their back on Europe" and that pulling out of the EU "doesn't mean pulling up the drawbridge."

"A poorer, weaker Europe is not in our interests any more than it's in theirs."

Davis: Brexit will be the biggest change for a generation

Credit: Reuters

"This is going to be the biggest change for a generation," the minister in charge of exiting the European Union, David Davis, has said, before calling for those who voted on either side to now come together.

Speaking at the Conservative Party conference, Davis said the credit for leaving the EU goes to his party.

"It will be this government - a Conservative government led by Theresa May - that will lead the United Kingdom out of the European Union and into a brighter and better future."

He also spoke of Margaret Thatcher, comparing Theresa May to the former prime minister. "Aren't we lucky our female leaders are there when we need them," Davis said.

He added that this is a "turning point in our nation's story," while saying "doommongers" who say this will be bad for Britain will be proven wrong.

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Davis calls for police to wear cameras after 'plebgate'

Senior Conservative MP David Davis has called for police officers to wear a camera and microphone while on duty in the wake of the "plebgate" row.

Mr Davis, an ally of Andrew Mitchell and a former shadow home secretary, wrote in The Times (£) that such technology could help curb the use of force by officers and also "help to defend police officers who have vexatious claims made against them".

David Davis is an ally of Andrew Mitchell and a former shadow home secretary. Credit: PA Wire

He said there is "a crisis of ethics" within the service and called for "root-and-branch reform of policing culture", starting with a Government-appointed Royal Commission to investigate their conduct.

"Regrettably it appears that the Mitchell case is merely a high-profile example, not an isolated one", he added.

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