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Diabetes UK 'delighted' health checks taken seriously

Diabetes UK said it is "delighted Public Health England is taking the NHS health check programme seriously".

A patient undergoing a blood test for diabetes.
Diabetes UK is 'delighted' the NHS health check programme is being taken seriously. Credit: Hugo Philpott/PA Wire

The charity's chief executive Barbara Young said they were "disappointed in the past" that too few people had the opportunity to be risk-assessed by NHS health care professionals.

"We are particularly pleased to see it is committing to a target of 75% uptake of the programme per year", she added.

Charity: Figures suggest 'insulin has been witheld'

The National Diabetes Inpatient Audit, which examined data from 13,400 patients, found that a fifth of patients suffered from hypoglycaemia while in hospital.

Bridget Turner, director of policy and care improvement at Diabetes UK, said that "even a single" case of ketoacidosis developing in hospital is "unacceptable" as it suggests insulin "has been withheld from that person for some time".

The fact that this is regularly happening raises serious questions about the ability of hospitals to provide even the most basic level of diabetes care.

In every aspect of hospital diabetes care that this report shines a light on, the picture that emerges is profoundly disturbing.

Medication errors are being made with alarming regularity, large numbers of people are not getting foot checks that we know can help prevent amputation, while one in 10 people's blood glucose level is dropping dangerously low during their hospital stay.

Put together, this adds up to a situation where in too many cases hospitals are doing people with diabetes more harm than good.

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Talking about diabetes helps you learn says sufferer

There are thought to be 850,000 people who don not know they have type 2 diabetes.

A record breaking three million people have now been diagnosed with the disease, and experts are warning unless more is done to prevent the condition, the NHS could become burdened with unsustainable costs.

Diabetes sufferer Lynda Marks said dealing with the condition is much easier once you start talking about it.

She said: "It's difficult... to begin with."

Read: Record three million diagnosed with diabetes

'Biggest' diabetes public awareness campaign launched

The biggest ever public awareness campaign on Type 2 diabetes risk factors is being introduced, as health experts reveal that three million people in Britain have been diagnosed with diabetes.

Funds raised will help to pay for research into a vaccine for Type 1 diabetes as well as aiming to identify the 850,000 people in the UK who could be at risk from the condition.

A blood sugar rating of 4.9, for non-diabetics a blood sugar rating of 4.0 to 5.9 is normal before meals Credit: Hugo Philpott/PA Archive

The partnership between Diabetes UK and Tesco aims to provide information and advice to almost a million people with Type 2 diabetes, helping them to understand how to manage their condition.

Every year 24,000 people with diabetes die earlier than expected in England and Wales.

'Rapid rise' in the number of those affected by diabetes

Urgent action is required to stop the problem of diabetes, a health organisation has warned.

Barbara Young, Chief Executive of Diabetes UK, said:

We are hugely concerned that the number of people diagnosed with diabetes has reached three million for the first time and there is no reason to think this will mark the end of what has been a rapid rise in the condition.

Instead, all the projections suggest that the three million figure will be a grim staging post on the road towards a public health emergency and this unfolding tragedy is already putting huge pressure on the NHS and will have potentially devastating consequences for those people who develop the condition. But this is not inevitable.

Record 'three million' diagnosed with diabetes

Three million Britons have been diagnosed with diabetes, research has shown.

It is the equivalent to 4.6 per cent of the population, and experts say the figure is growing, warning it was a "grim staging post towards a public health emergency".

A patient undergoing a blood test for diabetes as three million people are diagnosed with the condition Credit: Hugo Philpott/PA Wire

Research by Diabetes UK and Tesco has found that more than 130,000 people were diagnosed with the disease over the last year, with an estimated 850,000 people thought to have undiagnosed Type 2 diabetes.

Health experts say that the NHS could be burdened with unsustainable costs, unless more is done to prevent it.

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Adults over 40 urged to take diabetes test

All adults aged 40 and above should have a risk assessment for type 2 diabetes, according to the healthcare watchdog.

The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (Nice) has also recommended that people aged 25 and above of South Asian, Chinese, African-Caribbean or Black African descent, who are at a higher risk, should also perform a test.

People can be assessed at their GP surgery or community pharmacy but they can also perform self assessments online.

Department of Health 'taking wide-ranging action to tackle diabetes'

We are taking wide-ranging action to tackle diabetes. First through prevention - by encouraging healthier lifestyles and identifying those at risk and supporting them to take the necessary action to prevent diabetes. Secondly, by better management of the condition, both in hospital and in the community.

We hope to help prevent people getting diabetes in the first place, but by investing in the NHS and modernising it, we will also drive up the quality of care for those who have the disease.

– A Department of Health spokesman

What is Type 2 diabetes?

There are two main types of diabetes, known as Type 1 and Type 2. Both types of diabetes are lifelong health conditions.

Diabetes
Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes Credit: PA Wire

Type 1 diabetes usually develops early in life and is the most common type of diabetes in children. It occurs when the body is unable to produce any insulin.

Type 1 diabetes is treated with insulin injections, or by using an insulin pump. About 15% of people with diabetes have Type 1.

Type 2 diabetes is the most widespread form of the condition and usually develops later in life.

Type 2 diabetes develops when the body is unable to make enough insulin, or when the insulin that is produced does not work properly (known as insulin resistance).

Type 2 diabetes can be treated with diet and physical activity alone, or combining these with tablets.

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