Dwain Chambers

Chambers 'set' for Olympics

Dwain Chambers could soon be cleared to compete at London 2012 with his ban for doping reportedly set to be overturned.

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Sprinter Asafa Powell: Doping ruling 'patently unjust'

Jamaican sprinter Asafa Powell has issued a statement calling his 18-month ban for taking a banned substance 'patently unjust'.

Powell, 31, said he had unknowingly taken oxilofrine when he was using a legal supplement called Epiphany D1.

He added that his team had contacted doping authorities to point out that oxilofrine was not listed as an ingredient for Epiphany D1.

Asafa Powell issued a strongly worded statement after his 18-month ban for doping Credit: Michael Kappeler/DPA/Press Association Images

The former world record holder also questioned the severity of his punishment, claiming it was "clearly not based on the offense nor the facts surrounding it".

Powell's team is now preparing to take his case to the Court of Arbitration for Sport in Switzerland.

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Judge: Evidence in doping doctor case to be destroyed

by - Sports Editor
Spanish doctor Eufemiano Fuentes. Credit: REUTERS/Sergio Perez

The judge presiding over the case of Dr Eufemiano Fuentes, who received a suspended one year jail term for his blood doping services to cyclists, has ordered that the evidence must be destroyed.

The only way that could be stopped would be an appeal to the higher court.

So to confirm, Dr Fuentes received one year in prison which will not be served. Any sentence under two years is never served inside.

The four year ban he received applies only to his work as a sports doctor - he can carry on as a GP.

All evidence collected during Operacion Puerto will be destroyed if no one appeals the sentences.

Read: Doping doctor receives 1 year suspended prison term.

Read: Doctor's client list could leave stain on the sporting world.

Armstrong 'worried of potential criminal & civil liability'

The US Anti-Doping Agency has claimed that Lance Armstrong "was worried of potential criminal and civil liability" if he gave evidence to them about doping:

We have provided Mr Armstrong several opportunities to assist in our ongoing efforts to clean up the sport of cycling.

Following his recent television interview, we again invited him to come in and provide honest information, and he was informed in writing by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) that this was the appropriate avenue for him if he wanted to be part of the solution.

Over the last few weeks he has led us to believe that he wanted to come in and assist USADA, but was worried of potential criminal and civil liability if he did so.

Today we learned from the media that Mr Armstrong is choosing not to come in and be truthful and that he will not take the opportunity to work toward righting his wrongs in sport.

– US Anti-Doping Agency chief executive Travis Tygart

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Armstrong questioning 'would only demonise individuals'

Lance Armstrong's lawyer has said the cyclist will not be interviewed under oath by a U.S. Anti-Doping Agency official who wanted him to tell them all he knows about doping:

Lance is willing to cooperate fully and has been very clear: He will be the first man through the door, and once inside will answer every question, at an international tribunal formed to comprehensively address pro cycling, an almost exclusively European sport.

We remain hopeful that an international effort will be mounted, and we will do everything we can to facilitate that result.

In the meantime, for several reasons, Lance will not participate in USADA's efforts to selectively conduct American prosecutions that only demonise selected individuals while failing to address the 95% of the sport over which USADA has no jurisdiction.

– Lance Armstrong's lawyer Tim Herman

Armstrong 'won't give doping evidence under oath'

Lance Armstrong confessed to doping in an interview with Oprah Winfrey Credit: REUTERS/Harpo Studios, Inc/George Burns/Handout

Lance Armstrong's lawyer has said the cyclist won't be interviewed under oath by a U.S. Anti-Doping Agency official who wanted him to tell them all he knows about doping, according to the AP news agency.

USADA officials had said the disgraced cyclist must speak with them if he hoped to reduce his lifetime ban from sports. Today was the deadline for him to agree to speak to them.

Tim Herman said the process served "only to demonise selected individuals."

Doctor on trial for cycling doping

A Spanish doctor who may hold the secrets to drug cheating in football and tennis, has gone on trial in Madrid.

The public health charges against Eufemiano Fuentes relate only to cyclists he worked with.

But the man leading the worldwide fight against doping told ITV News that the doctor was involved with athletes from a variety of other sports. ITV News Sports Editor Steve Scott reports:

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