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Bieber to be taken to Miami-Dade County jail

Miami Police have confirmed that pop singer Justin Bieber will be taken to Miami-Dade County jail soon, following his arrest on suspicion of drag racing and drink-driving.

Justin Bieber accepts an award at the American Music Awards last year Credit: REUTERS/Danny Moloshok

Police have also named the other arrested person as an R&B singer known as Khalil. The pair will be taken to a first appearance at Miami-Dade County jail to face driving under the influence and drag racing charges.

Both Bieber's yellow Lamborghini and Khalil's red Ferrari were towed away according to the Miami Police.

Bieber allegedly failed sobriety tests before arrest

Miami Beach Police Department announced Canadian pop star Justin Bieber's arrest on twitter earlier today, with police officers claiming they saw two cars racing in the early hours of the morning, at 4:09am local time.

Aerial shot of Miami Police Department Credit: Reuters TV

Bieber allegedly failed a field sobriety test and was taken to the Miami Beach police station for a breath test according to reports.

Justin Bieber is held back by a member of his security team as he confronts a photographer outside his hotel in London i March 2013 Credit: Reuters TV

Miami Police spokesman, Sergeant Bobby Hernandez, said two vehicles had seemingly been used to block off an area for the drag race, with Bieber in a yellow Lamborghini. Another driver involved in the race in a red Ferrari was also arrested.

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Govt: Drink-driving has 'lifelong' consequences

Road safety minister Robert Goodwill warned young people to think twice before drink driving. Credit: DaybreakITV

Young people are putting their entire future at risk if they decide to get behind the wheel when drunk, the road safety minister warned.

Robert Goodwill told Daybreak despite road safety campaigns and stigmatisation, 280 people had died on Britain's roads last year because of drink driving.

He urged young people in particular to be careful during the Christmas party season:

"Young people don't see the consequences. They will think, 'well, I'll lose my licence for a year, I won't be able to drive,' but there will be long-term, lifelong effects.

"We are also tightening up some of the rules in future which will mean you will be able to be convicted on the roadside breath test, and not have the option of going back to the police station."

'One in three' drink drivers lose their jobs, warns AA

One in three people convicted of drink driving lose their jobs and all suffer "dramatic" and "traumatic" effects, the head of a car insurance giant warned.

AA president Edmund King added drink driving "hiked" up the price of vehicle insurance:

Drink-drive convictions have dramatic and traumatic snowball effects. One third of people will lose their jobs and experience years of hiked insurance premiums.

A snowball might melt away quickly while the effects of a driving ban last way beyond any winter thaw. If you are going to drive - don't drink. If you are going to drink - don't drive

– AA president Edmund King

Govt: Drink drivers could lose more than their licence

Drivers who get behind the wheel drunk risk losing more than their licence, the Government has warned.

Drivers could lose their jobs and damage future employment opportunities if they are caught drink driving, according to the Government. Credit: PA

The Government is urging drivers to consider the "snowball effect" of a drink driving conviction ahead of the Christmas party season, as part of their latest THINK! campaign.

People who drive as part of their job would be particularly at risk if they were caught drunk behind the wheel, as they would be denied access to millions of jobs which use criminal record checks to assess potential employees.

These jobs include professional driving jobs, teachers, care workers and jobs in banks and finance.

Wetherspoon to open first motorway pub amid outrage

Pub chain JD Wetherspoon has been given the green light to open its first pub at a motorway service station despite criticism from campaigners that it will "tempt" drivers to drink.

The new bar will open at the Extra service station in Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire later this year and will be licensed to serve alcohol between 8am and 1am.

A JD Wetherspoon sign at a public house in Putney south west London Credit: Fiona Hanson/PA Wire

Wetherspoon chairman Tim Martin called the unprecedented pub an "exciting new development" and said he hoped its would be "the first of many Wetherspoon's on the motorway".

However, road safety groups including Brake and the Alcohol Health Alliance have condemned the move saying the bar will send the wrong message to drivers.

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Scottish Justice Secretary asks for more powers

Justice Secretary Kenny MacAskill has also asked the UK transport secretary for the transfer of powers in areas such as random testing and tougher measures for young drivers:

This government welcomes having the power to set the drink-drive limit but the Scotland Act was a missed opportunity.

The very limited transfer of powers did not go far enough.

We wanted a package to be devolved that would allow us to consider whether the police should be able to carry out breath testing drivers anytime, anywhere, and powers to consider changing the penalties for drink-driving.

We also called for the chance to consider differential drink-driving limits. For example, for young and novice drivers.

None of these were devolved by the UK government and I have written to the Secretary of State for Transport calling for the UK government to reconsider.

– Justice Secretary Kenny MacAskil

Scottish drink-drive plans welcomed despite concerns

Labour's Lewis MacDonald has welcomed the proposal to reduce the limit but said it could potentially have resource implications at a time of cuts to police backroom staff.

"I am not, in principle, opposed to the further devolution of more powers in this area but I am concerned to see the legislation come forward using the powers that are devolved already in order for that to provide the basis to go forwards," he said.

Mr MacDonald praised the former Labour government at Westminster for commissioning Sir Peter North's independent review of the law on drink and drug driving.

"Random testing, for example, was one of the North recommendations that he was able to elucidate strong evidence for," he said.

"I think some of the other issues raised are less evidence-based but I don't think the priority at this stage is the debate around those powers.

"The priority is to ensure that the powers that we have are implemented effectively."

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