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Intern shot with 80,000 volt drone-mounted stun gun

An unfortunate intern at a tech conference in Texas collapsed to ground after being shot with a 80,000 volt stun gun mounted to a drone.

In a presentation at the South by Southwest Interactive conference in Austin, Chaotic Moon Studios showcased their new Chaotic Unmanned Personal Intercept Drone.

Designed to incapacitate potential intruders before police arrives, "CUPID" is equipped with a powerful stun gun.

The intern remained motionless on the floor after being struck down by the 80,000 volt gun.

In comparison, tasers used by the police in the UK generate a highest peak voltage of 50,000.

According to the company, he has recovered after the demonstration.

William Hurley, one of the Chaotic Moon Studios founders later tweeted a picture of the intern, who appeared intact while "enjoying his celebratory steak."

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US border agency grounds fleet after drone crashes

US Customs and Border Protection has grounded its drone fleet after a crew was forced to crash a pilotless craft off the coast of southern California, a spokesman said.

The crew operating the malfunctioning drone deliberately downed it in the Pacific Ocean last night after a mechanical problem.

The drone and systems on board were worth $12 million (£7.2m), the official said.

Hammond: Never 100% sure there won't be casualties

Defence Secretary Philip Hammond told ITV News' Deputy Political Editor Chris Ship that "you can never be 100% sure there won't be collateral damage", as the RAF unveiled its nerve centre of a controversial drone programme for the first time today.

Mr Hammond added: "We only know of one strike where there were civilian casualties. But of course, civilian casualties have also resulted from strikes by manned aircrafts. That is the nature of warfare".

'No difference' between operating drones and planes

RAF Wing Cdr Damian Killeen, the commanding officer of 13 Squadron has told ITV News that there is "absolutely no difference" between operating a drone and flying an aircraft in Afghanistan, as the RAF unveiled the nerve centre of its controversial drone programme for the first time.

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US and Yemen 'silent' on drone strikes

The six targeted killings in Yemen that Human Rights Watch says the US carried out Credit: Human Rights Watch

The US government only acknowledges its role in targeted killings in general terms, refusing to take responsibility for individual strikes or provide casualty figures, including civilian deaths, Human Rights Watch said in their report on drone attacks in Yemen

The Yemeni authorities have been almost as silent, the rights organisation said. Both governments have declined to comment on the six strikes that Human Rights Watch investigated.

Map details Pakistan drone attacks

The use of unmanned aircraft is a controversial human rights issue. Credit: Amnesty International

An interactive map published by Amnesty International details recent drone attacks the human rights organisation says the US carried out in northwest Pakistan.

Amnesty International found evidence that a number of civilians, including an elderly woman and a group of young labourers, were killed in drone strikes in North Waziristan between January 2012 and August this year.

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