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Eating disorder admissions 'increase by 8%'

The number of young people admitted to hospital suffering from anorexia or bulimia rose by 8% in 2012, according to Government data.

The Health and Social Care Information Centre found most of the 2,560 who went to hospital for inpatient treatment were very young - 15 was the most common age of admission for girls and 13 for boys.

But children aged five to nine and the under-fives were also admitted, they said.

The highest rate of admissions was in the north-east and south-west, where there were 6.5 admissions per 100,000 population, with the lowest rate in the east Midlands, where it was 2.8 per 100,000.

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NHS 'turning away patients with eating disorders'

The NHS is "failing" thousands of patients with eating disorders who are being turned away by doctors because their condition is not deemed serious enough, campaigners have claimed.

The NHS is 'turning away patients with eating disorders,' campaigners have claimed Credit: PA

Eating disorder charity BEAT has teamed up with Cosmopolitan magazine to makes the warning as it launches a joint campaign to urge GPs to take the potentially-fatal illness more seriously and widen treatment for it.

The campaigners claimed doctors are increasingly waiting for a sufferer to show extreme physical malnourishment before they begin treatment - a probelm described by the magazine's editor as a tick box culture in the NHS.

Getting rid of dieting 'could wipe out 70% of eating disorders'

An inquiry by MPs has heard more than half the British public suffers from a negative body image.

The diet industry acknowledged the public had "unrealistic expectations" about weight loss, while critics argued there was no evidence diets work in the long term

The inquiry, which took evidence from academics, the public, industry, charities and other experts, heard that

  • More than 95% of dieters regain the weight they lost
  • 1.6 million people in the UK suffer eating disorders
  • One in five people have been victimised because of their weight