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Ebola nurse Pauline Cafferkey discharged from hospital

File image of Pauline Cafferkey at the Royal Free Credit: Royal Free Hospital

Nurse Pauline Cafferkey has been discharged from the Royal Free Hospital, where she had been admitted following complications from a previous Ebola infection.

A statement from the hospital said that Ms Cafferkey, who contracted Ebola while working in West Africa more than a year ago, is not infectious.

Her recent spell in the Royal Free was the third time Ms Cafferkey has been treated in the hospital since returning to the UK after contracting Ebola.

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Pauline Cafferkey transferred to hospital in London

Pauline Cafferkey has been transported by an RAF Hercules plane from Glasgow to London where she will receive treatment at the Royal Free Hospital.

Pauline Cafferkey boarding a plane at Glasgow airport today Credit: SWNS

Bio security measures were in place to transport her to London because of her previous infection by the Ebola virus.

Pauline Cafferkey contracted Ebola while working in West Africa over a year ago Credit: PA

Royal Free: Cafferkey to be treated for Ebola 'complication'

Pauline Cafferkey is to be treated at the Royal Free Hospital Credit: PA

The Royal Free Hospital has confirmed that Pauline Cafferkey is to be transferred there for treatment for "a late complication" from when she was infected with the Ebola virus.

A spokesman for the hospital said:

We can confirm that Pauline Cafferkey is being transferred to the Royal Free Hospital due to a late complication from her previous infection by the Ebola virus. She will now be treated by the hospital's infectious diseases team under nationally-agreed guidelines. The Ebola virus can only be transmitted by direct contact with the blood or bodily fluids of an infected person while they are symptomatic, so the risk to the general public remains low and the NHS has well-established and practised infection control procedures in place.

– Statement from Royal Free Hospital

Ms Cafferkey was treated at the Royal Free when she was first infected with Ebola.

She was treated there again last year for meningitis caused by Ebola.

Pauline Cafferkey to be transferred to Royal Free hospital

Ms Cafferkey is expected to receive treatment at the Royal Free hospital Credit: PA

Pauline Cafferkey is expected to be transferred to London for treatment at the Royal Free hospital.

Reports said an RAF aircraft had landed at Glasgow Airport to transport Ms Cafferkey to London.

Nurse Pauline Cafferkey 'in stable condition'

Pauline Cafferkey is in a "stable" condition after being admitted to hospital for a third time since she contracted Ebola while working in West Africa.

An NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde spokesman said: "Ms Cafferkey was admitted to the Queen Elizabeth University Hospital under routine monitoring by the infectious diseases unit.

"She is undergoing further investigations and her condition remains stable."

Ms Cafferkey is being treated at the Glasgow hospital after "routine monitoring" identified a concern.

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Pauline Cafferkey 'under routine monitoring'

Last year Ms Cafferkey fell ill and was treated at the Royal Free Hospital Credit: Royal Free Hospital

Pauline Cafferkey has been admitted to Glasgow hospital and is "under routine monitoring", according to an NHS statement.

The statement added the hospital would not be releasing regular updates about her status.

Under routine monitoring by the Infectious Diseases Unit Pauline Cafferkey has been admitted to hospital for further investigations. To protect patient confidentiality, we will not be publishing regular updates on this patient’s condition.

– Statement from NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde

Last year Ms Cafferkey fell ill with what doctors labelled a "late complication" from Ebola.

It turned out the virus had re-emerged from her system, despite successful earlier treatment, to cause meningitis.

Ebola nurse Pauline Cafferkey admitted to hospital

Credit: ITV News

Pauline Cafferkey, the Glasgow nurse who contracted Ebola while working in West Africa over a year ago, has been admitted to hospital for the third time since contracting the disease, NHS officials have said.

Ms Cafferkey was originally infected while working in Sierra Leone in December 2014 and spent almost a month in an isolation unit at the Royal Free Hospital in London.

She was released after making a recovery but fell ill again in October last year and was again treated at the Royal Free for meningitis caused by Ebola.

Sierra Leone confirms second case of Ebola in a week

A health worker in Sierra Leone is helped into protective clothing at a treatment centre as the epidemic hit in 2014. Credit: Reuters

Sierra Leone has confirmed a new case of Ebola, its second in less than a week, marking a setback in efforts to end a two-year epidemic that has killed more than 11,300 people in West Africa.

Health ministry spokesman Sidi Yahyah Tunis described the new patient as a 38-year-old woman, a relative who had helped care for the earlier victim Mariatu Jalloh.

Jalloh died from the disease on January 12, and tested positive for Ebola posthumously.

In November, Sierra Leone was declared Ebola free after 42 days with no cases.

Guinea declared Ebola-free after more than 2,500 killed

A medical doctor wears a protective suit at an Ebola treatment centre in Guinea. Credit: PA

Guinea was declared free of Ebola on Tuesday after more than 2,500 people died from the virus in the west-African nation.

The declaration by authorities and the UN World Health Organization (WHO) was met by a mixed reception, with the outbreak not only claiming lives but also damaging the country's economy, health and education sectors.

The announcement means Liberia is now the only country still awaiting a countdown for the end of the epidemic.

There were more than 3,800 cases of Ebola in Guinea out of more than 28,600 cases worldwide, which have caused 11,300 deaths, according to the WHO.

A country is declared Ebola free 42 days after the recovery or death of the last patient and if there are no new infections.

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