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NHS plea to look out for elderly this winter

Health officials want to recruit an army of good samaritans to care for their elderly neighbours or friends this winter.

Elderly
The public need to be vigilant with their elderly neighbours and friends well-being this winter, health chiefs warned. Credit: PA

NHS England hopes 100,000 people will sign a pledge promising to look in on the elderly as the nights turn colder.

The scheme comes as a sharp rise in excess winter deaths was exposed, with pensioners the worst effected.

Figures released yesterday by the Office of National Statistics showed excess winter deaths rose by 29%, with over-75s accounting for 25,600 out of the 31,000 additional deaths.

Read more: 31,000 excess winter deaths

Poll: One in six OAPs hide serious health problems

One in six pensioners have hidden serious problems with their health from loved ones, a survey found.

Elderly
Families need to be more open with each about care options, Centra said. Credit: PA

The poll of 2,000 OAPs aged 65 and over found 16% had hidden an ailment because they were worried they would lose their independence or be seen as a burden, a survey found.

A further 12% thought if they made their injury known to family members they would be seen as incapable of looking after themselves.

Two thirds did not want to worry their loved ones.

The survey was carried out on behalf of telecare alarm provider Centra. Managing director Wendy Darling said: "There is a stigma that sometimes comes with growing older and it's clear this can stop people from facing up to the help they could get."

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Report: Ofgem disputes cause of energy price hikes

Ofgem has questioned the "Big Six" energy firms' claims that soaring bills are down to a rise in wholesale market prices of gas and power, the Financial Times reported.

The energy regulator's figures claim that wholesale prices increased by only 1.7% over the past year, which should have been reflected in a rise of only around £10 on bills.

Centrica argued that Ofgem's methodology is '"flawed".

Read: Energy price rise adds £134 to average yearly bill

Energy UK: 'No-one should be cold this winter'

Energy UK have issued a warning that "no-one should be cold this winter" and urged people to contact their energy company if they have failed to deliver insulation improvements in time to homes.

A statement said:

No-one should be cold this winter. If people are worried they should contact their energy company - they may have schemes to help and can offer advice.

Energy UK has been working with local authorities on the delivery of the ECO and the Green Deal. We have already held a number of roadshows round the country where participants - including local authorities, housing associations, providers, DECC and the Green Investment Bank - have been able to share their experiences and learn for best practice.

We appreciate that ECO, like any major new Government programme, takes time to bed in and for people to understand how things work, but the industry is committed to helping in that process.

– Spokesman for the energy industry's trade association, Energy UK

Read: Energy firms 'fail to deliver' insulation for homes

Household insulation warning over winter fuel bills

The Local Government Association have warned that tens of thousands of poor and elderly people will face another winter of high bills and cold homes because of the failure by energy companies to deliver insulation improvements in time.

The organisation, which represents 373 councils in England and Wales, urged the companies to work with local authorities to get the work done.

Energy companies are collecting this money through a levy which is contributing to the cost of fuel bills and they have an obligation to invest it as swiftly and effectively as possible to deliver upgrades which save vulnerable people money and keep them warm and healthy this winter.

Councils understand their communities and are uniquely well placed to pinpoint the areas where upgrades will do the most good. Local authorities up and down the country stand ready to work in partnership with the energy companies to make sure the hundreds of millions of pounds of unspent money is used to deliver warmer homes and lower bills to the people who need it most.

– Mike Jones, Local Government Association environment and housing board

Read: Energy firms 'fail to deliver' insulation for homes

Energy firms 'fail to deliver' insulation for homes

Analysis suggests power giants are more than 60 per cent behind their target to deliver more energy-efficient homes.
Analysis suggests power giants are more than 60 per cent behind their target to deliver more energy-efficient homes. Credit: ITV Tonight

Energy companies are falling behind in their obligation to pay for insulating the homes of tens of thousands of poor and elderly people, council leaders claimed.

An analysis released by the Local Government Association suggested that the power giants are more than 60% behind their target to deliver more energy-efficient homes.

This is despite raising almost £1 billion so far this year through the Energy Company Obligation (ECO) levy, which adds around £50 to the average household's annual bill.

The ECO is designed to raise money to deliver warmer homes for people on limited incomes and lower their utility bills by reducing the amount of energy they need to use.

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Government says care home neglect was 'appalling'

In response to an inquest that found neglect was a contributing factor in the deaths of five elderly residents at the Orchid View Care Home in West Sussex, a Department of Health spokesperson described the lack of care as "appalling".

They added: "We have made it clear that there must be a sharper focus on taking tougher action when things go wrong and holding those responsible to account.

"Confidence in the regulation regime has been shaken, but we have now turned a corner."

Daughter calls for 'dramatic changes to care system'

The daughter of a woman who died due to neglect at Orchid View care home said her mother was denied the "dignity and compassion" she deserved and called for "dramatic changes" to the care system to ensure that there are consequences for care home owners for "substandard services."

Speaking outside the court, Linzi Collins, whose mother Jean Halfpenny overdosed on a blood thinning drug whilst in the care home, said:

Linzi Collins, daughter of Jean Halfpenny, who died after being given an overdose of a drug thinning drug at Orchid View. Credit: Press Association

Read: Coroner finds care home guilty of neglect and 'institutionalised abuse'

"The horrific details that have emerged about Orchid View are beyond comprehension. How the corporate failings of Southern Cross could create these events and how such terrible standards could go unnoticed by the authorities for so long has left us baffled.

"In this day and age you expect measures to be in place to protect vulnerable members of society from being subjected to such horrendously poor care.

"Our mum deserved to be treated with dignity and compassion but Orchid View failed to provide her with even a basic level of care, despite being paid a significant amount of money to do so

"We believe dramatic changes are needed to the current care system, starting firstly with greater accountability for care home owners if they are found to be making unnecessary mistakes and offering substandard services."

Read: Police called after 28 drug errors made on a single night shift

Police called after 28 drug errors made in one night

Lisa Martin, a former care home worker who alerted police to failing at the Orchid View care home in Copthorne, said she the "final straw" for her came when she was told by a nurse that 28 drug errors had been made on just one night shift.

Lisa Martin, who alerted the police to care failings within Orchid View care home.
Lisa Martin, who alerted the police to care failings within Orchid View care home. Credit: Press Association

She called police who arrived the next day.

Read: Care home worker 'couldn't live with knowledge of abuse'

The coroner said 19 residents at Orchid View suffered "sub-optimal" care. All of those residents died from natural causes, she ruled. But five of those died from natural causes "which had been attributed to by neglect", Ms Schofield ruled.

They were Wilfred Gardner, 85, Margaret Tucker, 77, Enid Trodden, 86, John Holmes, 85, and Jean Halfpenny, 77.

Read: Coronor: Institutionalised abuse from the top down at care home

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