Live updates

DWP: There is more to do over employment

The Government's long-term economic plan to help businesses create jobs and get people working again is the right one, a Department for Work and Pensions spokeswoman said, after a think-tank recommended that jobcentres be split up.

With one of the highest employment rates ever and more people in work than ever before, it's clear that the Government's long-term economic plan to help businesses create jobs and get people working again is the right one.

However, we know there is always more to do, which is why our Jobcentre staff work hard every day to help people off benefits and into work.

– Spokeswoman, Department for Work and Pensions

Think-tank calls for 'radical overhaul' of jobcentres

The structure of public services means that often a jobseeker ends up being passed from pillar to post, the author of a new report suggests, after a think-tank called for jobcentres to be split up. Guy Miscampbell, said:

What is needed is a radical overhaul of the system which puts the needs of the jobseeker first. The very word jobcentre comes with a stigma.

Instead of attaching labels to people who are not in work we should reform the system to make it as easy as possible for individuals, who often have multiple problems, to work with an organisation that is best suited to helping them into work.

– Guy Miscampbell

Advertisement

Think-tank calls for jobcentres to be split up

Jobcentres should be split up, with their employment arms forced to compete against private sector and voluntary providers and the remaining services rebranded as Citizen Support, a think-tank has recommended.

Under the plan, the employment services arm would be mutualised, while the remaining part of Jobcentre Plus would be expanded and renamed to reduce the "stigma" attached to it.

 Jobcentres should be split up, think-tank suggests.
Jobcentres should be split up, think-tank suggests. Credit: PA

The right-of-centre Policy Exchange said just over a third (36%) of people using jobcentres find sustained work, with many finding themselves in and out of employment largely due to having barriers to work which are not fully dealt with.

The report said the Government's welfare reforms have improved matters, but there is still too much duplication and inefficiency in the system.

'Shocking waste of potential' in British schools

The sharp achievement gap between state and private school-educated pupils means there is a "shocking waste of potential", according to the chairman of educational charity the Sutton Trust.

Sir Peter Lampl's remarks come in the foreword to a new report that shows private school pupils will earn significantly more than their state school peers.

"This is a shocking waste of potential. This report clearly sets out the advantages that can be gained from a good private education," Sir Peter writes.

The Sutton Trust is calling for more independent schools to take on able pupils from less well-off backgrounds.

The charity suggests private schools should get the same funding per pupil as state schools, with the ability to charges fees on a means-tested basis, with the poorest paying nothing.

Their study suggests extending such a scheme to 100 leading private schools would cost the Government about £215 million a year.

Read: Private school pupils 'earn £200,000 more'

Private school pupils 'earn £200,000 more'

Children educated at private school are likely to earn almost £200,000 more over the course of their career than their counterparts in the state system, new research suggests.

Pupils from schools such as Eton will go on to earn significantly more than those educated at state school. Credit: David Parker/PA Archive/Press Association Images

A study by the Social Market Foundation found that between the ages of 26 and 42 a privately educated person will earn approximately £193,700 more on average than someone who went to state school.

The difference means an average private school pupil will earn 43% more than their state school peers by the age of 34, although this falls slightly to 34% by the aged of 42.

Minister: Flexible working hours 'are not a right'

The flexible working hours policy that the Government wants to extend is "not a right" and employers will be able to turn down inconvenient requests, the employment minister has told Good Morning Britain.

Lib Dem MP Jo Swinson maintained that the scheme was already "working well" for 10 million employees and said that extending it further would "help our economy".

Advertisement

Flexible working to become 'norm' under new rules

Flexible working will become the norm in all offices, with Britain's workforce happier as a result of the "end of presenteeism", the minister in charge of new rules claims today.

Productivity and happiness will increase and put an end to 'presenteeism', say ministers Credit: PA

Due to start tomorrow, 20 million employees across the country will be entitled to ask for flexible hours, including working from home. Employers will be obliged to consider requests reasonably, and millions are expected to take advantage of the changes.

Speaking to the Independent on Sunday, employment relations minister Jo Swinson said: "You get staff that are happy and more productive and the employers benefit from that as well. And lots of businesses are very positive about this".

Vince Cable: Exclusivity clauses for workers 'offensive'

Vince Cable has said clauses in zero-hour contracts that ban workers from jobs with other employers are "offensive".

Dr Cable told Radio 4's Today programme: "What happens is that people turn up for work under a zero-hours contracts, they’re not guaranteed any work, but they’re banned from working for other people...I think it’s that aspect of it that was offensive and constituted an abuse that we want to stop."

Vince Cable called exclusivity clauses 'offensive'.

The Business Secretary is bringing forward plans to outlaw these 'exclusivity clauses', although he has said that the broader idea of zero-hours contracts can be "perfectly sensible" for some workers.

Read: Banning exclusivity clauses 'misses bigger picture'

Young people not in education face 'alarming' prospects

The job prospects of young people who are not in full time education are deteriorating "rapidly", a new report has warned.

A study by the Trades Union Congress (TUC) found that young people outside education are now less likely to have a job than workers aged 50-64.

The TUC claimed the situation for low-skilled and unqualified youngsters is 'alarming'. Credit: PA

The trend has been described as a "remarkable" turnaround from the situation in 1998, when they were 25% more likely to be in work than older workers.

The TUC said the job situation for low-skilled and unqualified youngsters is "alarming", and warned that it would continue to deteriorate unless action was taken.

The Department for Work and Pensions disputed the findings, claiming the report was "wrong, misleading and irresponsible".

ONS: 4.2 million Brits now working from home

Close to one in seven people in employment work from home, according to new figures published today.

The number of workers who use their home as their office or as their main base has risen from 2.9 million in 1998 to 4.2 million in 2014.

The rate has also gone up in percentage terms from 11.1% to 13.9%.

The Office for National Statistics also found home workers were far more likely to be in highly skilled jobs in management, skilled trades and the professions.

Read: UK employment growth 'beats US and Europe'

Load more updates

Advertisement

Today's top stories