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Labour may offer voters an EU referendum

Labour could offer a referendum on Britain’s European Union membership at the next election, its policy director Jon Cruddas told The Daily Telegraph.

The opposition party would consider “in depth” whether to hand the vote to the public as it drafts its next manifesto, according to Cruddas, who is chairing Labour’s policy review.

“It’s something we will be looking at in depth in the policy review. At some stage there is going to have to be some resolution of what our relationship is here and what format that takes. It could be a referendum.

"We have said the time is not right as regards a referendum on Europe given the economics ricocheting around the eurozone. Obviously our position needs to be developed over the next period."

– Jon Cruddas

The paper claimed that Cruddas' comments would pile pressure on the Prime Minister, who is already facing calls from his party to give the public the EU vote.

Prime Minister hints at referendum on EU membership

The Prime Minister has hinted that the Conservative party may back a referendum on Britain's membership of the EU in the next parliament.

Speaking in Rio de Janeiro, where he is promoting UK businesses, he told a BBC reporter:

I don't think it is in Britain's interests to leave the EU but I do think what it is increasingly becoming the time for is a new settlement between Britain and Europe, and I think that new settlement will require fresh consent.

In the next parliament, I think there will be opportunities for a fresh settlement and for new consent to that settlement.

– david cameron

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Miliband ridicules PM over stance on Europe

Labour leader Ed Miliband has mocked David Cameron's stance on an EU referendum.

He told MPs that the Prime Minister was trying to appease the divisions in his own party, rather than acting in the interests of the nation.

Mr Miliband accused the PM of having a "hokey cokey weekend".

Three days, three positions. First it was no, then it was yes, then it was maybe.

Has there been a change in the Government's position, yes or no?

A nudge, nudge, wink, wink European policy is neither good for the country nor will it keep his party quiet.

PM rules out quick referendum on EU

David Cameron has risked angering Tory backbenchers by again refusing to back a quick poll on Britain's membership of the European Union.

The PM said he did not believe that voting to leave the EU would be the best thing for the country.

The right path for Britain is this. First, recognise that in the short term the priority for Europe is to deal with the instability and chaos.

Second, over time take the opportunities for Britain to shape its relationship with Europe in ways that advance our national interest in free trade, open markets and co-operation.

Third, all party leaders will have to address this question.

But it follows from my argument that far from ruling out a referendum for the future as a fresh deal in Europe becomes clear, we should consider how best to get the full consent of the British people.

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