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Should we leave the European Union altogether?

YouTuber Tom Harwood has a thing or two to say about the EU when he comes face to face with politicians at Leaders Live.

He says the union's founding principles are all well and good, but acknowledges that some feel it is now "more about people we've never voted for, or heard of, making laws that affect our lives".

"Is renegotiation required or are things broadly fine as they are? Should we leave altogether? Is our influence enhanced of diminished in the union?"

Leave your questions below his video on YouTube, of ask your own using the #LeadersLive tag.

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PM: Major's EU speech 'powerful, important and timely'

David Cameron said he agrees with Sir John Major after the former prime minister suggested the EU was often seen as showing a "lofty disdain" for British concerns.

During a speech in Germany, Sir John put the chance of a British exit from the European Union at "just under 50%" and warned it would become a reality unless there is genuine reform.

Sir John put the chance of a British exit from the EU at 'just under 50%'. Credit: Tim Ireland/PA

When asked about Sir John's speech, Cameron said, "I agree with what he said."

"When countries in Europe have difficulties that need to be addressed, Europe needs to have the flexibility to address them," he said, before describing Sir John's speech as powerful, important and timely.

May: Britain needs European arrest powers

Opting into the controversial European arrest warrant (EAW) will prevent Britain becoming a "honeypot" for European fugitives, the Home Secretary has said.

Opponents of the EAW cite concerns it is too easy for UK citizens to be extradited and some Conservative backbenchers have hinted at a revolt when the proposal comes to a vote in the Commons.

ITV News Political Correspondent Libby Wiener reports:

Labour 'pleased' May backs European arrest warrant

Home Secretary Theresa May. Credit: PA

The shadow home secretary has pledging Labour's support in a promised Commons vote on opting back in to the European Arrest Warrant.

Yvette Cooper said she was "pleased" that the Home Secretary was supporting the measure as Labour believed it was needed to protect Britain's borders and public safety.

Failing to do so would "much harder to deport foreign criminals and would also make it more difficult for us to bring British citizens who have committed crimes back to our country to face justice", she said.

Former immigration minister Damian Green said it would be "really dangerous" if Britain failed to opt back in to the warrant:

We would be the country in Europe where all Europe's criminals and terrorists would be inclined to come, because not only would we not be able to get terrorists back from other countries as quickly as we can now ... but also rapists, murderers, child molesters and so on would think Britain is probably the place to go where you'd have most chance of not being convicted of crimes you committed in the rest of Europe.

– Damian Green on BBC's The Andrew Marr Show

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Prime Minister's anger at €2 billion EU bill

David Cameron has said he is angry about the European Union demand for a £1.7 billion surcharge.

Farage defends joining forces with right-wing Polish MEP

Ukip leader Nigel Farage has defended his decision to join forces with a member of a right-wing Polish party to save his grouping in the European Parliament.

The Eurosceptic Europe of Freedom and Direct Democracy (EFDD) group escaped disbandment after it recruited Polish Congress of the New Right (KNP) member Robert Iwaszkiewicz, keeping up its tally of MEPs from at least seven member states.

Ukip leader Nigel Farage said he had found nothing in the MEP's background to suggest he was an extremist. Credit: Lynne Cameron/PA Wire

Farage insisted that he had found nothing in Iwaszkiewicz's background to suggest that he was an extremist.

Asked about the MEP's reported comment that there were "quite a few wives around who'd be brought back down to earth" if their husbands hit them, Farage told BBC Radio 4's The World At One, "I think that comment was a joke."

Hammond: EU must raise a billion euros to fight Ebola

Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond has said it is vital that the European Union raises one billion euros (£800 million) to help fight Ebola.

Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond Credit: APTN

Speaking ahead of a meeting of EU foreign ministers, he said: "There is a major health crisis here. We've got a very short window to get on top of it and prevent the uncontrollable spread of this disease."

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