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World Cup final most talked about game on Facebook

The World Cup final between Germany and Argentina was the most talked about sporting event ever on Facebook.

Full-time was the most talked about moment on Facebook. Credit: Facebook

Read: Morning papers hail 'Super Mario' after German win

Around the world, 88 million people had over 280 million interactions - posts, comments and likes - related to the match on the social networking site.

This beat Super Bowl XLVII on 3 February 2013, which received 245 million interactions.

The most talked about moment was the final whistle blowing, crowning Germany as champions, with Mario Gotze's winning goal in second place.

The German forward was also the most talked about player along with Argentina's talisman and captain Lionel Messi.

Read: Mario Gotze says World Cup win 'a dream come true'

Germany's win most talked about match on Facebook

Brazil's stunning loss against Germany in last night's World Cup semi-final was the most talked about match of the tournament so far on Facebook.

66 million people generated 200 million Facebook interactions on the match. Credit: Facebook

Read: The internet reacts to Brazil's World Cup humiliation

Around a quarter of all Facebook interaction came from Brazil alone with 16 million people making 52 million comments on the humiliating loss.

Germany's Thomas Muller, who scored one and set another goal up, was the most talked about player with Brazil defender David Luiz in second place.

The most talked about moment on the social networking site was Sami Khedira scoring Germany's fourth goal in seven minutes and giving his side a 5-0 lead with an hour left in the match.

Read: Brazil's loss most talked about game ever on Twitter

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Facebook apology after 'psychological experiments'

Facebook's chief operating officer Sheryl Sandberg has said sorry for 'poorly communicating' the details of science tests the social networking company carried out.

Facebook's chief operating officer Sheryl Sandberg has offered something of an apology after 'phsychelogical experiments' were exposed.
Facebook's chief operating officer Sheryl Sandberg has offered something of an apology after 'phsychelogical experiments' were exposed. Credit: Reuters

The US technology giant and two American universities secretly altered almost 700,000 users' news feeds to study the impact of "emotional contagion".

“This was part of ongoing research companies do to test different products, and that was what it was; it was poorly communicated,” Sandberg said during a meeting with potential advertisers in India, *according to the Wall Street Journal. *

“And for that communication we apologize. We never meant to upset you."

British regulators are to investigate whether Facebook broke data protection laws by letting researchers conduct a psychological experiment on unknowing users.

Read: UK regulators probe Facebook

UK regulators probe Facebook experiment

British regulators are to investigate whether Facebook broke data protection laws by letting researchers conduct a psychological experiment on unknowing users.

The Information Commissioner's Office said it would be asking the social network questions and would also liaise with Irish regulators, as the company's European headquarters are in Dublin.

Although the regulator has not specified which laws the site may have infringed, it has the power to force companies to change their policies and can also issue fines up to £500,000 for breaching the Data Protection Act.

Read: Facebook users react angrily to 'creepy' experiment

Facebook study: 'Positive expressions were reduced'

A government-sponsored study of Facebook was to see whether positive or negative words in messages would lead to positive or negative content in status updates.

Facebook study: 'Positive expressions were reduced' Credit: PA

Its authors wrote: "Emotional states can be transferred to others via emotional contagion, leading people to experience the same emotions without their awareness.

"When positive expressions were reduced, people produced fewer positive posts and more negative posts; when negative expressions were reduced, the opposite pattern occurred.

"These results indicate that emotions expressed by others on Facebook influence our own emotions, constituting experimental evidence for massive-scale contagion via social networks."

Read: Facebook users react angrily to a 'creepy' experiment

Facebook users react angrily to a 'creepy' experiment

Users of Facebook have reacted angrily to a "creepy" experiment carried out by the social network and two American universities to manipulate their emotions. The US technology giant secretly altered almost 700,000 users' news feeds to study the impact of "emotional contagion".

Facebook users react angrily to a 'creepy' experiment. Credit: Dave Thompson/PA Wire/Press Association Images

It tinkered with the algorithm controlling users' feeds to find out what effect it had on their moods in January 2012.

The aim of the government-sponsored study was to see whether positive or negative words in messages would lead to positive or negative content in status updates.

Read: Facebook users react angrily to a 'creepy' experiment

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Facebook 'back to 100%' after global outage

Facebook was reported as down in several countries this morning.
Facebook was reported as down in several countries this morning. Credit: Dave Thompson/PA Wire

Facebook has apologised for a brief outage that left users unable to access the site across the world this morning.

In a statement, the company said: "Earlier this morning, we experienced an issue that prevented people from posting to Facebook for a brief period of time. We resolved the issue quickly, and we are now back to 100%.

"We're sorry for any inconvenience this may have caused."

Read: Facebook back online after short worldwide outage

Facebook users report outage around the world

Facebook users around the world have reported an outage in the service.

Tssbfctk_normal

#Facebook is down. Not just in #Iraq, but also Australia, Japan, Thailand and many others. Feels good.

Read: Facebook down with users around world unable to access site

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