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Livestock farmer: 'Things are undoubtedly tough'

Tim Jones, a livestock farmer from Worcestershire, told Daybreak that "things are undoubtedly tough" for farmers.

Farmer Tim Jones says things are "tough" at the moment.

He said a harsh winter has been followed by a run of dry weather, which has left livestock farmers like him, "desperately short of grass" for the sheep.

"Input costs have gone up, with animal feed now 18% more expensive than it was 12 months ago", he added.

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Wheat crops 'written off' because of bad weather

Food prices are likely to rise after UK farmers reported a poor harvest due to the rainy summer.

Today Environment Secretary Owen Paterson will address farming representatives at a summit which will discuss ways of improving farmers' access to financial support.

  • A decline in winter wheat of around 12%, with some crops written off, the crop will rely on good growing conditions from now on
  • Demand of winter barley and oats has declined, and planting has suffered, winter oats could in stead be replaced by spring oats
  • A quarter of oilseed rape is in a "very poor condition"

Could the British weather be getting wetter?

Environment Secretary Owen Paterson will host a summit for farming representatives, charities and banks to discuss the effects of last year's bad weather on the industry.

Following the second wettest year since records began, farmers have warned that heavy rainfall could affect the price of food.

Long-term averages of 30-year periods show an increase in annual rainfall of about 5% from 1961-1990 to 1981-2010:

  • 1961-1990: 1100.6mm
  • 1971-2000: 1126.1mm
  • 1981-2010: 1154.0mm

Source: Met Office

Owen Paterson: We should be proud of our farmers

Environment Secretary Owen Paterson said the UK should be "proud" of the "fantastic" job farmers do.

He will hold a summit today to discuss the financial worries of many farmers after a year of bad weather.

Environment Secretary Owen Paterson Credit: Rui Vieira/PA Wire

He added: "This last year has been particularly tough. Farming contributes a huge amount to our environment and our economy.

"We want to ensure that farmers are able to deal with challenges like bad weather, to grow their businesses, create new jobs and help the country compete in the global race."

Minister hosts summit to help farmers after 'tough' year

A landmark summit will be held by Environment Secretary Owen Paterson to help farmers after a "particularly tough" year.

A vehicle manages to get across the flooded Somerset Levels during heavy rain last year Credit: Ben Birchall/PA Wire

Banks, charities and farming representatives will attend the meeting at the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs.

Ways of improving farmers' access to financial support after a year of bad weather will be discussed.

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Cold snap farm animals death toll tops 29,000

Almost 29,000 farm animals died following recent cold weather in Northern Ireland, it was revealed today.

Sheep huddle together in the hills above the Glens of Antrim, Northern Ireland. Credit: PA

Stormont Agriculture Minister Michelle O'Neill said 28,437 fallen animals had been collected.

Some of the worst snow to affect the rural community for years fell at the end of March and the ground remained treacherous well into April.

A sheep in the hills above the Glens of Antrim, Northern Ireland. Credit: PA

The Agriculture Minister intends to bring to the Stormont ministerial Executive proposals for a hardship scheme.

This will be capped at a maximum of 7,500 euro (£6,320) per farmer, including the collection and disposal costs of the fallen animals.

Weetabix halts production of two cereals after poor harvest

In a statement Weetabix have confirmed that they have had to halt production of two cereals due to the impact of last year's bad weather on the wheat crops.

We can confirm that unfortunately due to technical issues we have been unable to make Weetabix Minis and Oatibix Bitesize to our exacting standards and have taken the decision to reduce production to resolve the issues.

This has meant a shortage of supplies of these products to the retailers.

This is a temporary reduction in production and we are working hard to fully restore normal capacity so our consumers can once again enjoy the products at their best quality.

The Weetabix Minis and Oatibix Bitesize range are made in a unique factory and no other produce made by The Weetabix Food Company are affected. We apologise for the inconvenience that this may have caused our consumers but assure them of our commitment to make great tasting nutritional breakfast cereals of the highest quality.

The problem is linked to the quality of wheat caused by the extreme wet and cold weather during last year’s growing season. We remain committed to sourcing local wheat, weather permitting.

– Weetabix statement
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